Blue By Me, Blew Bye You

Fulton Books, Inc.
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Blue by Me, Blew Bye You is my first book of poems. It is my description of what poetry is to me. It is what I use to process my life’s ups and downs and the good and bad—memories that I want to remember. These are poems of the places my heart has been to; it’s a journey through my world.

I believe that this book of poetry will relate to many of you who have gone through so many of life’s experiences dealing with love, hope, anger, and death. These poems live somewhere between a poem and a short story of my life, and I cherish them because I have lived in each one of them.





“Anger, You Bully”



Anger, you bully

backup off me, you have

no place here, so keep moving on

away from me.
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About the author

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Additional Information

Publisher
Fulton Books, Inc.
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Published on
Mar 7, 2018
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Pages
108
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ISBN
9781633387393
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Language
English
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Genres
Poetry / American / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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A cultural “biography” of Robert Frost’s beloved poem, arguably the most popular piece of literature written by an American

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“The Road Not Taken” seems straightforward: a nameless traveler is faced with a choice: two paths forward, with only one to walk. And everyone remembers the traveler taking “the one less traveled by, / And that has made all the difference.” But for a century readers and critics have fought bitterly over what the poem really says. Is it a paean to triumphant self-assertion, where an individual boldly chooses to live outside conformity? Or a biting commentary on human self-deception, where a person chooses between identical roads and yet later romanticizes the decision as life altering?

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