Assessment as Learning: Using Classroom Assessment to Maximize Student Learning, Edition 2

Corwin Press
2
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Your key to understanding how formative assessment improves learning!

Using clear explanations and poignant cases, this timely resource shows how formative assessment can be used to understand student beliefs, inform classroom instruction, and encourage student reflection. Fully revised, this second edition features:

  • Discussion of the complex nature of learning
  • Ways to use formative assessment in a variety of contexts
  • Real-life examples and case studies of assessment in action
  • Sample rubrics and lesson plans for easy implementation
  • Ideas for Follow-up at the end of each chapter
  • Insights into common classroom dilemmas along with viable solutions
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About the author

Lorna M. Earl is a director of Aporia Consulting Ltd. and a retired associate professor from the Department of Theory and Policy Studies at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. She was the first director of assessment for the Ontario Education Quality and Accountability Office, and she as been a researcher and research director in school districts for over 20 years.

Throughout her career, Earl has concentrated her efforts on policy and program evaluations as a vehicle to enhance learning for pupils and for organizations. She has done extensive work in the areas of literacy and the middle years, but has concentrated her efforts on issues related to evaluation of large-scale reform and assessment (large-scale and classroom) in many venues around the world. She has worked extensively in schools and school boards, and has been involved in consultation, research, and staff development with teachers' organizations, ministries of education, school districts, and charitable foundations. Earl holds a doctorate in epidemiology and biostatistics, as well as degrees in education and psychology.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Corwin Press
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Published on
Dec 4, 2012
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Pages
160
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ISBN
9781452284361
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Testing & Measurement
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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