Crime Fiction as World Literature

Bloomsbury Publishing USA
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While crime fiction is one of the most widespread of all literary genres, this is the first book to treat it in its full global is the first book to treat crime fiction in its full global and plurilingual dimensions, taking the genre seriously as a participant in the international sphere of world literature. In a wide-ranging panorama of the genre, twenty critics discuss crime fiction from Bulgaria, China, Israel, Mexico, Scandinavia, Kenya, Catalonia, and Tibet, among other locales. By bringing crime fiction into the sphere of world literature, Crime Fiction as World Literature gives new insights not only into the genre itself but also into the transnational flow of literature in the globalized mediascape of contemporary popular culture.
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About the author

Louise Nilsson is a researcher in the English Department at Stockholm University, Sweden.

David Damrosch
is Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Literature at Harvard University, USA, where he is also Chair of the Department of Comparative Literature. Professor Damrosch is one of the world's foremost authorities on World Literature, past President of the American Comparative Literature Association, and author or editor of 17 books, including the ground-breaking What Is World Literature? (2003; translated into seven languages). Among his other publications are How to Read World Literature (2009), The Buried Book: The Loss and Rediscovery of the Great Epic of Gilgamesh ( 2007), and World Literature in Theory (edited; 2014).

Theo D'haen is Professor of English and American Literatures at K.U. Leuven, Belgium. He is the author or editor of 53 books, including American Literature: A History (2014), The Routledge Concise History of World Literature (2012), World Literature: A Reader (edited with César Domínguez and Mads Rosendahl, 2013), A World History of Literature (2012), and The Routledge Companion to World Literature (edited with David Damrosch and Djelal Kadir, 2012).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing USA
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Published on
Feb 23, 2017
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781501319341
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / Comparative Literature
Literary Criticism / General
Literary Criticism / Mystery & Detective
Literary Criticism / Semiotics & Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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 •Illustrated with the original Illustrations. 

•Table of contents to every chapters in the book. 

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His Last Bow is a collection of seven Sherlock Holmes stories (eight in some editions) by Arthur Conan Doyle, first in The Strand Magazine September 1908 to December 1913, plus the one-off title story (September 1917), also called A Reminiscence of Sherlock Holmes under Reminiscences of Mr. Sherlock Holmes. "The Adventure of Wistaria Lodge" was originally in two parts: "The Singular Experience of Mr. John Scott Eccles" and "The Tiger of San Pedro". [2] "Wistaria" is not misspelled here, later often spelled "Wisteria".


I find it recorded in my notebook that it was a bleak and windy day towards the end of March in the year 1892. Holmes had received a telegram while we sat at our lunch, and he had scribbled a reply. He made no remark, but the matter remained in his thoughts, for he stood in front of the fire afterwards with a thoughtful face, smoking his pipe, and casting an occasional glance at the message. Suddenly he turned upon me with a mischievous twinkle in his eyes.

"I suppose, Watson, we must look upon you as a man of letters," said he. "How do you define the word 'grotesque'?"

"Strange—remarkable," I suggested.

He shook his head at my definition.

"There is surely something more than that," said he; "some underlying suggestion of the tragic and the terrible. If you cast your mind back to some of those narratives with which you have afflicted a long-suffering public, you will recognise how often the grotesque has deepened into the criminal. Think of that little affair of the red-headed men. That was grotesque enough in the outset, and yet it ended in a desperate attempt at robbery. Or, again, there was that most grotesque affair of the five orange pips, which let straight to a murderous conspiracy. The word puts me on the alert."

"Have you it there?" I asked.

He read the telegram aloud.


"HAVE JUST HAD MOST INCREDIBLE AND GROTESQUE EXPERIENCE. MAY I CONSULT YOU?—SCOTT ECCLES, POST OFFICE, CHARING CROSS."


"Man or woman?" I asked.

"Oh, man, of course. No woman would ever send a reply-paid telegram. She would have come."

"Will you see him?"

"My dear Watson, you know how bored I have been since we locked up Colonel Carruthers. My mind is like a racing engine, tearing itself to pieces because it is not connected up with the work for which it was built. Life is commonplace, the papers are sterile; audacity and romance seem to have passed forever from the criminal world. Can you ask me, then, whether I am ready to look into any new problem, however trivial it may prove? But here, unless I am mistaken, is our client."

A measured step was heard upon the stairs, and a moment later a stout, tall, grey-whiskered and solemnly respectable person was ushered into the room. His life history was written in his heavy features and pompous manner. From his spats to his gold-rimmed spectacles he was a Conservative, a churchman, a good citizen, orthodox and conventional to the last degree. But some amazing experience had disturbed his native composure and left its traces in his bristling hair, his flushed, angry cheeks, and his flurried, excited manner. He plunged instantly into his business.

"I have had a most singular and unpleasant experience, Mr. Holmes," said he. "Never in my life have I been placed in such a situation. It is most improper—most outrageous. I must insist upon some explanation." He swelled and puffed in his anger.

"Pray sit down, Mr. Scott Eccles," said Holmes in a soothing voice. "May I ask, in the first place, why you came to me at all?"

"Well, sir, it did not appear to be a matter which concerned the police, and yet, when you have heard the facts, you must admit that I could not leave it where it was. Private detectives are a class with whom I have absolutely no sympathy, but none the less, having heard your name—"


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