Tea Classic

Rickard Nygårds
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Tea Classic (Cha Jing) is the oldest book in the world on tea. It was written by the greatest tea master of the Chinese Tang dynasty. His name was Lu Yu. In a simple, yet beautiful, language he tells the story of tea as it was known more than 1,000 years ago.

Lu Yu explains in great detail how to make the perfect cup of tea. Other important topics include tea cultivation, tea drinking, how to manufacture all the equipment, and where to find the best water. Lu Yu says, for example, that: ”It is only in the city and within the gates of nobility that the aesthetic experience of tea is maimed if any of the 24 utensils is missing”.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Rickard Nygårds
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Published on
Feb 21, 2018
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Pages
134
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ISBN
9789198339420
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Cooking / Beverages / Coffee & Tea
History / Asia / China
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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