Nationalism, Globalization, and Africa

Springer
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Nationalism, especially supranationalism is the bane of global governance, and globalization. Whereas globalization seeks to unify the globe to function to advantage, supranationalisms operate to frustrate the coherence and achievement of this aim. This book delves into the Theories of Nationalism, the contours of supranational activity within global politics, international political economy, and global trade alliances vis-à-vis Africa. The book also identifies a list of African countries with identical issues, serial political difficulties, or time bombs ticking, and examines the performance of their political economies and new security challenges, using global indicators.
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About the author

MICHAEL AMOAH obtained his doctorate in Politics from Middlesex University, UK, where he also taught. He has held academic appointments at the University of London and The Open University. He specializes in Theories of Nationalism, Global Politics, International Politics of Africa, and Political Economy. He is currently an Associate of the Africa International Affairs Programme at LSE IDEAS – a centre for the study of international affairs, diplomacy and grand strategy at the London School of Economics.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Nov 16, 2011
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781137002167
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Africa / General
Political Science / General
Political Science / Globalization
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / Political Ideologies / General
Political Science / World / African
Social Science / Anthropology / General
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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