A Spatial Approach to Regionalisms in the Global Economy

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The author challenges the traditional manner in which regionalization has been approached and suggests that the failure to come to grips with this phenomenon is the result of the modernist regulation of space to margins of analysis. He advances instead a spatially orientated approach which views states as one of multiple layers of a global social space. Regionalization represents the construction of new layers in an effort to search for an institutional fix to the challenges of globalization.
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About the author

MICHAEL NIEMANN is Associate Professor of International Studies at Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut.
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Published on
Jan 26, 2016
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Business & Economics / International / Economics
Business & Economics / International / General
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / Political Economy
Political Science / Public Policy / Economic Policy
Social Science / Sociology / General
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