The Roots of Participatory Democracy: Democratic Communists in South Africa and Kerala, India

Springer
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This book compares the Communist parties of India and South Africa in their pursuits of socialist democracy. Williams looks at their organizational characteristics, party history, and their competing tendencies, as well as how they have pushed forward their similar ideologies within their unique political and economic environments.
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About the author

MICHELLE WILLIAMS is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Political Studies at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
May 26, 2008
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Pages
215
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ISBN
9780230612600
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / Political
Political Science / General
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / Political Ideologies / General
Political Science / World / African
Political Science / World / Asian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction finalist

Winner of the 2014 National Book Award in nonfiction.

An Economist Best Book of 2014.

A vibrant, colorful, and revelatory inner history of China during a moment of profound transformation

From abroad, we often see China as a caricature: a nation of pragmatic plutocrats and ruthlessly dedicated students destined to rule the global economy-or an addled Goliath, riddled with corruption and on the edge of stagnation. What we don't see is how both powerful and ordinary people are remaking their lives as their country dramatically changes.

As the Beijing correspondent for The New Yorker, Evan Osnos was on the ground in China for years, witness to profound political, economic, and cultural upheaval. In Age of Ambition, he describes the greatest collision taking place in that country: the clash between the rise of the individual and the Communist Party's struggle to retain control. He asks probing questions: Why does a government with more success lifting people from poverty than any civilization in history choose to put strict restraints on freedom of expression? Why do millions of young Chinese professionals-fluent in English and devoted to Western pop culture-consider themselves "angry youth," dedicated to resisting the West's influence? How are Chinese from all strata finding meaning after two decades of the relentless pursuit of wealth?

Writing with great narrative verve and a keen sense of irony, Osnos follows the moving stories of everyday people and reveals life in the new China to be a battleground between aspiration and authoritarianism, in which only one can prevail.

The Fringe Dwellers is an offbeat, darkly quirky comedy about a couple (Christian and Laura) that constantly breaks up and gets back together. At the start of the novel, they’ve broken up nine times already. Well, ten if you count the time Laura broke up with Christian and he didn't realize it because he thought she was just out of town. Their love story is disrupted by the presence of Christian’s grade school nemesis and first love, Susan. Susan and Christian were always more intense than anyone else in their grade. During naptime, they were the only ones who used an abacus to count sheep. Susan is currently dating Christian’s best friend Mark, a lawyer at a very prestigious law firm – they don’t even advertise on television. Giving Christian advice are his 400 pound cab driver friend, Abu, who used to be over 800 pounds and his therapist friend, Thelma, who has issues of her own. Complicating things is the presence of Christian’s ex-girlfriend, Cindy Lou Hurtsong, a faded country singer attempting a comeback after drug rehab, a presidential affair and several misguided appearances on celebrity reality shows. Her stage name is actually Cindy Mae Hurtsong. She decided to record under the name Cindy Mae instead of Cindy Lou because she thought the name Cindy Lou made her sound too much like a hick. Throw in Laura’s fourteen year old pot-smoking niece, Christian’s battling parents who wrap each other’s Christmas presents every year in half-filled out divorce papers and Mean Old Miss Bostwick, Christian’s malevolent downstairs landlord who prefers Tasering tenants rather than going through the hassle of filling out eviction notices and it becomes a question of whether love can overcome all the complications life throws at it.
Terrie Williams knows that Black people are hurting. She knows because she's one of them.

Terrie had made it: she had launched her own public relations company with such clients as Eddie Murphy and Johnnie Cochran. Yet she was in constant pain, waking up in terror, overeating in search of relief. For thirty years she kept on her game face of success, exhausting herself daily to satisfy her clients' needs while neglecting her own.

Terrie finally collapsed, staying in bed for days. She had no clue what was wrong or if there was a way out. She had hit rock bottom and she needed and got help.

She learned her problem had a name -- depression -- and that many suffered from it, limping through their days, hiding their hurt. As she healed, her mission became clear: break the silence of this crippling taboo and help those who suffer.

Black Pain identifies emotional pain -- which uniquely and profoundly affects the Black experience -- as the root of lashing out through desperate acts of crime, violence, drug and alcohol abuse, eating disorders, workaholism, and addiction to shopping, gambling, and sex. Few realize these destructive acts are symptoms of our inner sorrow.

Black people are dying. Everywhere we turn, in the faces we see and the headlines we read, we feel in our gut that something is wrong, but we don't know what it is. It's time to recognize it and work through our trauma.

In Black Pain, Terrie has inspired the famous and the ordinary to speak out and mental health professionals to offer solutions. The book is a mirror turned on you. Do you see yourself and your loved ones here? Do the descriptions of how the pain looks, feels, and sounds seem far too familiar? Now you can do something about it.

Stop suffering. The help the community needs is here: a clear explanation of our troubles and a guide to finding relief through faith, therapy, diet, and exercise, as well as through building a supportive network (and eliminating toxic people).

Black Pain encourages us to face the truth about the issue that plunges our spirits into darkness, so that we can step into the healing light.

You are not on the ledge alone.
With more than three-quarters of a million copies sold since its first publication, The Craft of Research has helped generations of researchers at every level—from first-year undergraduates to advanced graduate students to research reporters in business and government—learn how to conduct effective and meaningful research. Conceived by seasoned researchers and educators Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams, this fundamental work explains how to find and evaluate sources, anticipate and respond to reader reservations, and integrate these pieces into an argument that stands up to reader critique.

The fourth edition has been thoroughly but respectfully revised by Joseph Bizup and William T. FitzGerald. It retains the original five-part structure, as well as the sound advice of earlier editions, but reflects the way research and writing are taught and practiced today. Its chapters on finding and engaging sources now incorporate recent developments in library and Internet research, emphasizing new techniques made possible by online databases and search engines. Bizup and FitzGerald provide fresh examples and standardized terminology to clarify concepts like argument, warrant, and problem.

Following the same guiding principle as earlier editions—that the skills of doing and reporting research are not just for elite students but for everyone—this new edition retains the accessible voice and direct approach that have made The Craft of Research a leader in the field of research reference. With updated examples and information on evaluation and using contemporary sources, this beloved classic is ready for the next generation of researchers.
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