The Roots of Participatory Democracy: Democratic Communists in South Africa and Kerala, India

Springer
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This book compares the Communist parties of India and South Africa in their pursuits of socialist democracy. Williams looks at their organizational characteristics, party history, and their competing tendencies, as well as how they have pushed forward their similar ideologies within their unique political and economic environments.
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About the author

MICHELLE WILLIAMS is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Political Studies at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
May 26, 2008
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Pages
215
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ISBN
9780230612600
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / Political
Political Science / General
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / Political Ideologies / General
Political Science / World / African
Political Science / World / Asian
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Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction finalist

Winner of the 2014 National Book Award in nonfiction.

An Economist Best Book of 2014.

A vibrant, colorful, and revelatory inner history of China during a moment of profound transformation

From abroad, we often see China as a caricature: a nation of pragmatic plutocrats and ruthlessly dedicated students destined to rule the global economy-or an addled Goliath, riddled with corruption and on the edge of stagnation. What we don't see is how both powerful and ordinary people are remaking their lives as their country dramatically changes.

As the Beijing correspondent for The New Yorker, Evan Osnos was on the ground in China for years, witness to profound political, economic, and cultural upheaval. In Age of Ambition, he describes the greatest collision taking place in that country: the clash between the rise of the individual and the Communist Party's struggle to retain control. He asks probing questions: Why does a government with more success lifting people from poverty than any civilization in history choose to put strict restraints on freedom of expression? Why do millions of young Chinese professionals-fluent in English and devoted to Western pop culture-consider themselves "angry youth," dedicated to resisting the West's influence? How are Chinese from all strata finding meaning after two decades of the relentless pursuit of wealth?

Writing with great narrative verve and a keen sense of irony, Osnos follows the moving stories of everyday people and reveals life in the new China to be a battleground between aspiration and authoritarianism, in which only one can prevail.

Nearly half of all physicians and biologists are females, as are the majority of new psychologists, veterinarians, and dentists, suggesting that women have achieved equality with men in the workforce. But the ranks of professionals in math-intensive careers remain lopsidedly male; up to 93% of tenure-track academic positions in some of the most mathematically-oriented fields are held by men. Three main explanations have been advanced to explain the dearth of women in math-intensive careers, and in The Mathematics of Sex, Stephen J. Ceci and Wendy M. Williams describe and dissect the evidence for each. The first explanation involves innate ability--male brains are physiologically optimized to perform advanced mathematical and spatial operations; the second is that social and cultural biases inhibit females' training and success in mathematical fields; the third alleges that women are less interested in math-intensive careers than are men, preferring people-oriented pursuits. Drawing on research in endocrinology, economics, sociology, education, genetics, and psychology to arrive at their own unique, evidence-based conclusion, the authors argue that the problem is due to certain choices that women (but not men) are compelled to make in our society; that women tend not to favor math-intensive careers for certain reasons, and that sex differences in math and spatial ability cannot adequately explain the scarcity of women in these fields. The Mathematics of Sex represents the first time such a thorough synthesis of data has been carried out to solve the puzzle of women's underrepresentation in math-intensive careers. The result is a readable, engaging account suitable not only for academics in an array of disciplines, but for general readers as well--including educators, science policymakers, parents of daughters, and anyone intellectually curious about a key controversy of our time.
The eighth edition of Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education and Exercise Science, now published in paperback and hardback, offers students a clear and practical guide to best practice for measurement and evaluation in school- and nonschool-based physical activity programs.

Written by two academics with backgrounds in physical education teacher education (PETE), the book emphasizes the link between theory and practice and reflects the most recent changes in national physical education programs. It covers a full range of introductory topics, including current trends in measurement and evaluation, program development, statistics, test selection, and an expanded chapter on alternative assessment, before introducing:

• measurement for health-related physical fitness

• measurement for psychomotor skills

• measurement for cognitive knowledge

• measurement for affective behaviors

• grading

• self-evaluation.

Each chapter features learning aids such as objectives, key terms, practical applications, and review questions, while an appendix offers in-depth Excel assignments. Offering a full companion website featuring an instructor’s manual, lecture slides, and a test bank, Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education and Exercise Science is a complete resource for instructors and students, alike. It is an essential text for students in measurement and evaluation classes as part of a degree program in physical education, exercise science or kinesiology, and a valuable reference for practitioners seeking to inform their professional practice.

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