Mathematics the Truth: ‘Moving mathematics teaching into the age of quantum mechanics and relativity.’

Malcolm Cameron
93
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‘Mathematics the Truth: Moving mathematics teaching into the age of quantum mechanics and relativity’ by Malcolm Cameron


“Serious, light-hearted, insight.”

“Shakes mathematics teaching icons …”

“Rescues mathematics from a black hole.”


Currently mathematics is taught like a Latin, without motivation, restricted to the period from Euclid in the BC to the Renaissance. 


This thinking degrades mathematics which is fundamental. Without mathematics sciences are merely observational nature study, engineering is trial and error, while technology is only training in use of imported stuff anyway. 


Mathematics is the great philosophical basis for understanding the universe from the Quantum to Cosmology and Relativity, its history and future. Citizens ought to know what is happening in these subjects, and in experiments probing the structure of the universe, at least in concept.


We must at least note where classical mathematics and physics are in error giving a lead for future understanding of quantum computing, for example, and for many biological and physical phenomena. Reference to the unknown, the un-understood, and the unexpected are the major motivation to understand any subject.

 

‘Mathematics the Truth’ is popular, real, modern mathematics but not a popularization. It is a book for anyone who wants to put the motivation back into mathematics. Anyone who wants to know the unknown, the un-understood, and the unexpected in mathematics. 


‘Mathematics the Truth’ is suitable for use in upper secondary schools, but will be golden to anyone interested in mathematics from the true angle.


You will never look at mathematics in the same way again


You are a brainy bastard.

Malcolm McDonald, FEDFA Union, State President, 1992-96

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About the author

Author of 'Heritage Mathematics' Edward Arnold 1982

PhD School of Physics, University of Sydney, 1971

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4.6
93 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Malcolm Cameron
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Published on
Dec 8, 2017
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Pages
168
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ISBN
9781925635782
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Language
English
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Genres
Mathematics / History & Philosophy
Mathematics / Research
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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