Traditional Recipes of the Axarquia

Malcolm Coxall - Cornelio Books
1
Free sample

The Axarquía is a small, remarkable corner of Andalucía in Spain. It has witnessed some of the most culturally cataclysmic events of the last 40,000 years of European history, such as the arrival of the first modern human beings in Europe, the invasion of the Phoenicians, Byzantines, Romans, Visigoths, Arabs and most recently, the Christians. It is a bountiful area with fertile soils and a good climate. However, it is not always an easy place. In just a few years the climate of the area can fluctuate from abundance to drought. The geography of the region makes access very difficult; to this day many of its villages are remote, often inaccessible. These extraordinary historical, climatic and geographical conditions have made the Axarquía an area of great diversity. One of the most interesting facets of the region is its cuisine. It is full of Roman, Arab, Jewish and Christian culinary tradition. The cuisine of the Axarquía is a delicious and exciting voyage of exploration in taste and history.
Read more

About the author

Malcolm Coxall, the author, is the proprietor of the family's 110 acre farm in the Axarquía of southern Andalucía in Spain. The farm has been certified as organic since 1999 and produces olives, almonds and culinary herbs. Malcolm also provides business, marketing and IT consultancy to other organic food producers in the region. He has published articles on sustainable agriculture, organic food production, forest biodiversity, environmental protection and environmental economics. He is active in the European food and environmental movement, and has taken several successful legal actions in defence of European environmental standards in the European Court of Justice. Malcolm is passionate about food sovereignty and the maintenance of local food production at fair prices. He believes that culinary diversity, agricultural sustainability and traditional gastronomy have much to teach a generation that has basically forgotten how food is grown and prepared. "Truly good food is local, ethical, organic and slow. How and what we eat defines who we are as a society. Societies that knowingly eat chemically adulterated junk foods, produced in heartless factory farms, reveal an intrinsic social, political and health malaise. They reveal their lack of sustainability, an inherent insecurity and a disconnection from their natural and social context. Contrast this care-less mentality with those societies which treasure their land, their natural environment, their people, their traditional cuisine and the quality and purity of their food. Then explain to me again why we need fast food and how "factory agriculture" fits in with human and environmental well-being and sustainability. To be sustainable, what we really need to do is to start to understand food again - beginning with the basics - both on the farm and in the kitchen. We could do worse than to try to understand our own local gastronomic heritage again. Not only is this worthwhile and important, but it is also great fun to discover how to make and enjoy real food again."

Read more

Reviews

5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Malcolm Coxall - Cornelio Books
Read more
Published on
Jul 18, 2013
Read more
Pages
238
Read more
ISBN
9788494085376
Read more
Features
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Cooking / General
Cooking / Regional & Ethnic / General
Cooking / Regional & Ethnic / Spanish
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Malcolm Coxall
For any traveller crossing Spain it is soon obvious that every region has its own distinctive culinary specialities. Look a little closer and we realise that every province also has its own specialities. Indeed, when we really begin to dig deeper, we find that most villages also have their own very particular recipes. This high degree of culinary diversity may come as a nice surprise to many a jaded palate. Sadly, in much of the industrial world we are accustomed to bland, standardised and utilitarian food. Even at times like Christmas, when good food should be central, few really local specialities exist in our rather monochrome "Westernised" gastronomy. Gladly, Spain mostly avoided this "industrialisation" of food so that most people remain avidly interested in and proud of their own food products and their regional dishes. This attitude probably explains the huge number of Michelin stars in the country. Spain is a treasure trove of food diversity, with centuries of cultural influences from Romans, Arabs, Jews and Christians contributing to many of the dishes still served today. Spain is blessed with a pride and love of its own traditional recipes, combined with a range and variety of ingredients that many a chef outside of Spain can only dream about. Christmas is a special time in Spain and there are few people in the world as capable of making Christmas into a truly special occasion. The Spanish have a love and understanding of good food. Taken together with their ability to enjoy a good party, Christmas in Spain is truly a culinary delight. Here we present you with just some of the multitude of traditional Spanish Christmas Recipes. Enjoy them and Feliz Navidad!
Malcolm Coxall
Tapas are a unique, ancient and delicious feature of Spanish traditional cuisine. They come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, ranging from a simple slice of bread and cheese, through hearty hot stews and soups, to elaborate and delicate, exquisitely presented gourmet canapés. Every region of Spain has its own favourites, often based on local products. Despite the preconception that Spanish food is dominated by meat and fish, the reality is that at least half of the traditional tapas recipes in Spain are in fact vegetarian.

The author, Malcolm Coxall, a lifelong vegetarian and lover of Spanish gastronomy, has collected a delicious selection of traditional meatless tapas. As he says: "Just because you don't eat meat or fish, it doesn't mean you have to miss out on Spain's most famous food culture - the tapa. Indeed, the opposite is true; Spain has at least as many vegetarian tapas as there are with meat and fish ingredients. More than 3000 years of multi-cultural evolution in food preparation in Spain has given us one of the world's most inventive and diverse culinary traditions. The Muslim Moors, the Jews, the Christians and the "New World" all brought new radical ideas to agriculture and traditional cooking in Spain. In a country where meat is still often considered something of a luxury, meatless dishes are common. Tapas are no exception to this. So here we present just a tiny sample of the vast array of meatless tapas available in the country. Here we present a collection of 280 traditional vegetarian tapas recipes of Spain. Enjoy!"

For this collection of recipes we have divided the book into the following chapters:

Preface
1. Introduction
1.1 History of the Tapa
1.2 The "Tapas Culture"
1.3 Traditional Ingredients and Techniques
2. The Recipes
2.1 The Recipes - An Introduction
2.2 Tapas, Canapés and Montaditos with Bread and Toast
2.3 Pâtés
2.4 Pickles, Marinades, Jams, and Conserves
2.5 Soups, Creams, Sorbets, Purees, Porras, and Sauces
2.6 Potato Tapas
2.7 Croquette Tapas
2.8 Rice and Pasta Tapas
2.9 Tapas made with Beans, Nuts, Lentils and Chickpeas
2.10 Salad Tapas
2.11 Vegetable Tapas
2.12 Mushroom Tapas
2.13 Tortillas
2.14 Stews and Fricassees
2.15 Empanadas and Pies
2.16 Cheese Tapas
2.17 Sweet Tapas
List of recipes - Spanish names
List of recipes - English names

Malcolm Coxall

Traditional democratic structures in the Western world are coming under increasing pressure. A combination of political corruption, voter apathy and attacks on the rights of the citizen are being driven by authoritarian tendencies not seen for generations. In turn, this is being stoked by an artificial climate of fear, choreographed as a narrative of external terrorist threats and war against yet another "evil empire".

Much of the decision-making of government has been bought or hijacked by big business, whilst a whole generation of citizens has become increasingly cynical about the probity and ethics of their politicians. The current extent of public distrust and antagonism for the political elite is matched only by shocking levels of voter apathy throughout the democratic world.

This situation has created an unhealthy and perilous disconnection between the electorate and the political classes. As in any evolving environment, this gap is being filled. In this case, the democratic deficit is being bypassed using various forms of civil rebellion as a substitute for a functioning parliamentary system.

Nonviolent rebellion has a long history, but since the industrial revolution the use of organised civil disobedience has become increasingly widespread and refined. With the advent of the internet, civil rebellion itself has been totally revolutionised. The rules of the game have truly changed and control of "the truth" has, to some extent, finally been democratised.

These days, the big beasts on the political landscape are no longer labour unions fighting a local cause, but global movements, representing hundreds of millions of activists across a borderless world. And their armoury is formidable. Even the smallest local protest group has been immensely empowered by recent technological change.

Here we present a practical guide to civil rebellion, defining more than 300 separate ways in which citizens may effectively deliver a protest to an authority and the public, either alone or in a group.

In comparison with the ballot box, civil disobedience seems a rough way of dealing with authority. But, in the absence of a functioning democracy, it is rapidly becoming the last resort of the citizen to defend their freedom from an increasingly reviled, dysfunctional and autocratic political establishment.

This book is a practical guide. It is designed to help in the routine planning and organisation of peaceful protest. But the book also includes a history of civil rebellion and a moral and legal discussion of how civil disobedience may be used to achieve political objectives. This practical information is supported by a description of the best techniques for use in the strategic planning of protest actions and the management of protest organisations.

Though based on a wealth of protest history, the emphasis of this book is on contemporary protest and it focuses especially on the impact of internet and communications technology on current protest campaigns.

Politically, this guide pays particular attention to the techniques used by authorities to infiltrate and undermine legitimate civil protest movements and how these efforts can be detected and managed by a protest group. The book also provides practical advice on using similar subversive techniques against unscrupulous authorities.

Above all, the objective of this guide is to facilitate responsible political activists in delivering powerful, effective, nonviolent protests to an authority and to do this in a way which positively reinforces the concepts of democracy and universal human rights.

At a time when both democracy and human rights are threatened by the constant attacks by political opportunists, civil disobedience is beginning to move centre stage. Indeed, it seems to be rapidly becoming the only show in town for the aggrieved citizen of liberal persuasions in a world drowning in political corruption, popular apathy and short-sighted, populist political culture.

Malcolm Coxall
For any traveller crossing Spain it is soon obvious that every region has its own distinctive culinary specialities. Look a little closer and we realise that every province also has its own specialities. Indeed, when we really begin to dig deeper, we find that most villages also have their own very particular recipes. This high degree of culinary diversity may come as a nice surprise to many a jaded palate. Sadly, in much of the industrial world we are accustomed to bland, standardised and utilitarian food. Even at times like Christmas, when good food should be central, few really local specialities exist in our rather monochrome "Westernised" gastronomy. Gladly, Spain mostly avoided this "industrialisation" of food so that most people remain avidly interested in and proud of their own food products and their regional dishes. This attitude probably explains the huge number of Michelin stars in the country. Spain is a treasure trove of food diversity, with centuries of cultural influences from Romans, Arabs, Jews and Christians contributing to many of the dishes still served today. Spain is blessed with a pride and love of its own traditional recipes, combined with a range and variety of ingredients that many a chef outside of Spain can only dream about. Christmas is a special time in Spain and there are few people in the world as capable of making Christmas into a truly special occasion. The Spanish have a love and understanding of good food. Taken together with their ability to enjoy a good party, Christmas in Spain is truly a culinary delight. Here we present you with just some of the multitude of traditional Spanish Christmas Recipes. Enjoy them and Feliz Navidad!
Malcolm Coxall
Tapas are a unique, ancient and delicious feature of Spanish traditional cuisine. They come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, ranging from a simple slice of bread and cheese, through hearty hot stews and soups, to elaborate and delicate, exquisitely presented gourmet canapés. Every region of Spain has its own favourites, often based on local products. Despite the preconception that Spanish food is dominated by meat and fish, the reality is that at least half of the traditional tapas recipes in Spain are in fact vegetarian.

The author, Malcolm Coxall, a lifelong vegetarian and lover of Spanish gastronomy, has collected a delicious selection of traditional meatless tapas. As he says: "Just because you don't eat meat or fish, it doesn't mean you have to miss out on Spain's most famous food culture - the tapa. Indeed, the opposite is true; Spain has at least as many vegetarian tapas as there are with meat and fish ingredients. More than 3000 years of multi-cultural evolution in food preparation in Spain has given us one of the world's most inventive and diverse culinary traditions. The Muslim Moors, the Jews, the Christians and the "New World" all brought new radical ideas to agriculture and traditional cooking in Spain. In a country where meat is still often considered something of a luxury, meatless dishes are common. Tapas are no exception to this. So here we present just a tiny sample of the vast array of meatless tapas available in the country. Here we present a collection of 280 traditional vegetarian tapas recipes of Spain. Enjoy!"

For this collection of recipes we have divided the book into the following chapters:

Preface
1. Introduction
1.1 History of the Tapa
1.2 The "Tapas Culture"
1.3 Traditional Ingredients and Techniques
2. The Recipes
2.1 The Recipes - An Introduction
2.2 Tapas, Canapés and Montaditos with Bread and Toast
2.3 Pâtés
2.4 Pickles, Marinades, Jams, and Conserves
2.5 Soups, Creams, Sorbets, Purees, Porras, and Sauces
2.6 Potato Tapas
2.7 Croquette Tapas
2.8 Rice and Pasta Tapas
2.9 Tapas made with Beans, Nuts, Lentils and Chickpeas
2.10 Salad Tapas
2.11 Vegetable Tapas
2.12 Mushroom Tapas
2.13 Tortillas
2.14 Stews and Fricassees
2.15 Empanadas and Pies
2.16 Cheese Tapas
2.17 Sweet Tapas
List of recipes - Spanish names
List of recipes - English names

©2017 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.