The Craft of Bookbinding

Courier Corporation
3
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Most book lovers are familiar with the frustration of having a treasured book fall apart from age or use or both. Now the solution is at hand in this modestly priced, step-by-step guide to the craft of hand bookbinding. With this book, you'll learn how to restore not only ailing hardcovers, but paperbacks, periodicals, and other materials as well.
Profusely illustrated with over 250 photos and drawings by the author, the clear, concise text gives details of book sewing of all types — antique, flexible, outside cords, lockstitch, whipstitch, and more, as well as the modern practice of perfect binding in which the bound book is composed of single sheets. You'll also learn how to make endpapers, attach headbands, case in, and cover with book cloth, buckram, artificial leather, and other materials. Finally, Mr. Banister offers clear instructions for adding titling and decoration with gold leaf, gold and metal foils, and printed labels.
In short, this expert guide will teach you everything you need to know about bookbinding — even how to build your own book press and other equipment. An updated list of suppliers will help you locate any other materials you may need.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Courier Corporation
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Published on
Aug 3, 2012
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Pages
160
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ISBN
9780486152455
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Language
English
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Genres
Crafts & Hobbies / Book Printing & Binding
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Edith Diehl
Edith Diehl (1876–1955) was one of the world's foremost practitioners of traditional bookbinding and an exceptionally able teacher. From the vantage point of a lifetime's experience, she gives today's bookbinders a historical survey of this centuries-old art and an eminently practical guide.
Nearly one half of the encyclopedic volume is devoted to an overview of the historical development of bookbinding. The author shows how the codex form of the book became identified with the Christian era, how bookbinding became a craft and trade in the 15th century, and how the production and distribution of books shifted from the monasteries and universities to the illustrious printer-publishers of the 15th and 16th centuries. She describes various bookbinding practices such as sewing, the use of boards and leathers, hand versus machine binding, cased books, etc. And she examines in depth the different national styles of book decoration in Italy, France, England, Germany, North America, and other countries, and the specific contributions of such influential bookbinders as Jean Grolier, Thomas Mahieu, Le Gascon, Samuel Mearne, Roger Payne, Jacob Krause, Edmund Ranger, and John Ratcliff. Ninety-two full-page plates provide visualization of certain key points and, above all, numerous examples of the finest decorated bindings.
Edith Diehl then guides the reader through more than 400 profusely illustrated pages on the craft of hand bookbinding. She details and illustrates the steps involved in the nearly 30 necessary binding operations: collating and paging, pulling and removing glue, guarding and mending, pressing, sewing, backing, lacing-in, headbanging, lining up back, casing texts in protective cover, covering, cutting inside margins and filling in, and many more. In addition she conveys much useful information on such ancillary topics as doublures, fly-leaves, half bindings, limp bindings, vellum bindings, slipcases, repairing old bindings, cleaning and washing papers, materials (leather, paper, gold leaf, glue, paste), finishing tools, tooling, lettering, etc. The 242 illustrations that accompany this book-within-a-book are unmatched for economy and clarity.

Book 15
Galaxy Science Fiction was an American digest-size science fiction magazine, published from 1950 to 1980. It was founded by an Italian company, World Editions, which was looking to break into the American market. World Editions hired as editor H. L. Gold, who rapidly made Galaxy the leading science fiction (sf) magazine of its time, focusing on stories about social issues rather than technology.

Gold published many notable stories during his tenure, including Ray Bradbury's "The Fireman", later expanded as Fahrenheit 451; Robert A. Heinlein's The Puppet Masters; and Alfred Bester's The Demolished Man. In 1952, the magazine was acquired by Robert Guinn, its printer. By the late 1950s, Frederik Pohl was helping Gold with most aspects of the magazine's production. When Gold's health worsened, Pohl took over as editor, starting officially at the end of 1961, though he had been doing the majority of the production work for some time.

Under Pohl Galaxy had continued success, regularly publishing fiction by writers such as Cordwainer Smith, Jack Vance, Harlan Ellison, and Robert Silverberg. However, Pohl never won the annual Hugo Award for his stewardship of Galaxy, winning three Hugos instead for its sister magazine, If. In 1969 Guinn sold Galaxy to Universal Publishing and Distribution Corporation (UPD) and Pohl resigned, to be replaced by Ejler Jakobsson. Under Jakobsson the magazine declined in quality. It recovered under James Baen, who took over in mid-1974, but when he left at the end of 1977 the deterioration resumed, and there were financial problems—writers were not paid on time and the schedule became erratic. By the end of the 1970s the gaps between issues were lengthening, and the title was finally sold to Galileo publisher Vincent McCaffrey, who brought out only a single issue in 1980. A brief revival as a semi-professional magazine followed in 1994, edited by H. L. Gold's son, E. J. Gold; this lasted for eight bimonthly issues.

At its peak, Galaxy greatly influenced the science fiction field. It was regarded as one of the leading sf magazines almost from the start, and its influence did not wane until Pohl's departure in 1969. Gold brought a "sophisticated intellectual subtlety" to magazine science fiction according to Pohl, who added that "after Galaxy it was impossible to go on being naive." SF historian David Kyle agrees, commenting that "of all the editors in and out of the post-war scene, the most influential beyond any doubt was H. L. Gold". Kyle suggests that the new direction Gold set "inevitably" led to the experimental New Wave, the defining science fiction literary movement of the 1960s.
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