Shards of Love: Exile and the Origins of the Lyric

Duke University Press
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With the Spanish conquest of Islamic Granada and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain, the year 1492 marks the exile from Europe of crucial strands of medieval culture. It also becomes a symbolic marker for the expulsion of a diversity in language and grammar that was disturbing to the Renaissance sensibility of purity and stability. In rewriting Columbus's narrative of his voyage of that year, Renaissance historians rewrote history, as was often their practice, to purge it of an offending vulgarity. The cultural fragments left behind following this exile form the core of Shards of Love, as María Rosa Menocal confronts the difficulty of writing their history.
It is in exile that Menocal locates the founding conditions for philology--as a discipline that loves origins--and for the genre of love songs that philology reveres. She crosses the boundaries, both temporal and geographical, of 1492 to recover the "original" medieval culture, with its Mediterranean mix of European, Arabic, and Hebrew poetics. The result is a form of literary history more lyrical than narrative and, Menocal persuasively demonstrates, more appropriate to the Middle Ages than to the revisionary legacy of the Renaissance. In discussions ranging from Eric Clapton's adaption of Nizami's Layla and Majnun, to the uncanny ties between Jim Morrison and Petrarch, Shards of Love deepens our sense of how the Middle Ages is tied to our own age as it expands the history and meaning of what we call Romance philology.
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About the author

María Rosa Menocal, R. Selden Rose Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Yale University, is the author of The Arabic Role in Medieval Literary History and Dante's Cult of Truth, also published by Duke University Press.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Duke University Press
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Published on
Dec 22, 1993
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Pages
312
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ISBN
9780822381853
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / Medieval
Literary Criticism / Poetry
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Volume 37— Literary Appropriations—examines medieval literature in a different light. This volume features six original articles, focusing on the art of appropriation, as well as fourteen reviews of recent scholarly publications.

The first article “The Oldest Manuscript Witness of the First Life of Blessed Francis of Assisi” by Jacques Dalarun reveals the oldest known source of the writings of Francis of Assisi, until of late only found in an Italian church publication. Lisa Bansen-Harp’s essay “Ironic Patterning and Numerical Composition in the Vie de saint Alexis: Form and Effect/Affect” takes an ironic look at the oppositions used throughout the work to offer a rich analysis of patterns. Reexamining genealogy as spiritual rather than biological is Nicole Leapley’s essay “Rewriting Paternity: The Meaning of Renovating Westminster in La Esoire de seint Aedward le rei.” David Lummus’s essay “Boccaccio’s Three Venuses: On the Convergence of Celestial and Transgressive Love in the Genealogie Deorum Gentilium Libri” provides a comparative look of how love—celestial and transgressive—can be seen in the Decameron. “Dante’s Justinian, Cino’s Corpus: The Hermeneutics of Poetry and Law” by Lorenzo Valterza compares and contrasts Dante’s own view of law versus that of his friend Cino da Pistoia. Lastly, editor Paul Clogan contributes his own article “Dante’s Appropriation of Lucan’s Cato and Erichtho” to demonstrate the importance of Lucan’s characters in Dante’s own work Along with these articles, fourteen reviews, from the United States and all over the world, are included, truly making Medievalia et Humanistica an international publication.

To reflect the submissions and audience for Medievalia et Humanistica, the editorial and review boards include ten members from the United States and ten international members, making this a truly international publication.

For submission guidelines, please email Jin Yu at jyu@rowman.com

Please submit books for review consideration to:

Attention: Reinhold F. Glei
Medievalia et Humanistica
Ruhr-University Bochum
Seminar fuer Klassische Philologie
D-44780 Bochum, Germany
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