Conjugation and Deconjugation of Ubiquitin Family Modifiers

Subcellular Biochemistry

Book 54
Springer Science & Business Media
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† 1 a a 4 † 17 10 15 ubiquitin; and of 16 VCP 17 18 20 33 34 34 36 p domain. 41 42 42 43 P U 42 47 binding. C. elegans 16 In 21 22 50 51 52 53 13 and UFD 4 10 of Cdc48. 18 30 of Ufd2. COFACTORS 47 23 13 47 47 47 72 15 15 and of Spt23 p90. Ufd2 and Cdc48. In C. elegans 74 16 75 75 76 76 Ufd2 25 54 54 7 56 p47 7 7 80 30 30 81 82 82 but and CD3 26 DUB COFACTORS 30 UFD3 OTU1 4 Cdc48 30 4 OLE1. 15 27 87 REFERENCES 30 REGULATION OF UBIQUITIN MONOUBIQUITINATION UBIQUITINATION 1 32 7 S) d 33 12 13 14 15 18 19 15 20 21 35 15 15 27 15 31 32 31 33 36 monoubiquitination of pol pol 34 37 34 monoubiquitination. 20 35 trans 3 15 REFERENCES by monoubiquitination. Mol Cell; 2009. UBIQUITIN LIGASE ACTIVITY BY Nedd 1 2 of 41 5 6 8 fold. 9 13 14 edd 43 18 18 K M and k 18 22 23 K M 24 25 K M 26 edd 45 18 27 K M K D 18 25 . 8 10 M 21 28 MECHANISM AND REGULATION OF CRLs 34 41 34 edd 47 48 S. pombe 49 51 p27 and I by SCF and SCF 57 58 59 60 CTD CTD CTD CTD in Cul5 CTD CTD CTD 60 18
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MARCUS GROETTRUP is a Professor for Immunology in the Department of Biology of Konstanz University in Germany. His main interests are in the role of the immunoproteasome in antigen fragmentation and autoimmunity. Moreover, he has studied the function and conjugation of the ubiquitin‐like protein FAT10. He studied biochemistry in Tübingen and ET H Zürich and did his diploma thesis in the laboratory of H. Hengartner and R. Zinkernagel. During his PhD at the Basel Institute for Immunology with H. von Boehmer he discovered the pre T cell receptor. After habilitation at Humboldt University Berlin in the group of P‐M. Kloetzel on the topic of antigen processing he founded his own group at the Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Switzerland. Since 2002 he holds the Chair of Immunology at the University of Konstanz, Germany. Several prizes were awarded to Dr. Groettrup like the Award of the Sandoz Foundation for Therapeutic Research, the Karl Lohmann Prize of the German Society for Biological Chemistry, the Langener Science Prize of the Paul Ehrlich Institute, and the Research Award by the CaP CURE foundation.
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Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Jan 11, 2011
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Pages
252
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ISBN
9781441966766
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Physiology
Medical / Research
Science / Life Sciences / Biochemistry
Science / Life Sciences / Microbiology
Science / Life Sciences / Molecular Biology
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This content is DRM protected.
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