Say it Better in English: Useful Phrases for Work & Everyday Life

Language Success Press
11
Free sample

This new self-study ESL book will help you speak better English at work, on the phone, at the store, with friends, at parties, with your co-workers. The new method in this ESL book makes it easy to improve your English. You learn phrases one by one so you can study for as little as two minutes a day! This new method will help you speak better English at work, on the phone, at the store, with friends, at parties, with your co-workers. The English you need everyday is yours! This new method makes it easy to improve your English. You learn useful phrases that people use in everyday situations. You learn phrases one by one so you can study for as little as two minutes a day. Give this book two minutes a day. Or more if you want to improve your English even faster. There's 368 pages packed full of the American English you need to know! This new method uses the tools you need to learn: - You learn over 300 useful phrases one by one - Cartoons show the phrases in real-life situations - Lots of lively examples help you remember - Exercises help you check your new knowledge
Read more

About the author

Marianna Pascal has taught English as a Second Language (ESL) in Canada, the USA, Australia, and South East Asia. She currently operates her own language school in Malaysia. In addition to teaching, Marianna, from Montreal, Canada, has developed English language course material for Excel Books and Scholani Educational College in Australia, for ELS Language Centers in Malaysia, and for her own school. Marianna has been a presenter at several international language conferences and has published papers on language teaching in educational journals.
Read more
4.8
11 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Language Success Press
Read more
Published on
Dec 31, 2007
Read more
Pages
368
Read more
ISBN
9780972530088
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Foreign Language Study / English as a Second Language
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
For years Richard Hoggart has observed the oddity of a common speech habit: the fondness for employing ready-made sayings and phrasings whenever we open our mouths, a disinclination to form our own sentences "from scratch," unless that becomes inescapable. But in this book he is interested in more specific questions. How far do the British, and particularly the English, share the same sayings across the social classes? If each group uses some different ones, are those differences determined by location, age, occupation or place in the social scale? Over the years, did such sayings indicate some of the main lines of their culture, its basic conditions, its stresses and strains, its indications of meaning, and significance? These and other concerns animate this fascinating exploration of how the English, and particularly working-class English, use the English language.

Hoggart sets the stage by explaining how he has approached his subject matter, his manner of inquiry, and the general characteristics of sayings and speech. Looking back into time, he explores the idioms and epigrams in the poverty setting of the early working-class English. Hoggart examines the very innards of working-class life and the idioms, with the language that arose in relation to home, with its main characters of wives and mothers, husbands and fathers, and children; the wars; marriage; food, drink, health, and weather; neighbors, gossip, quarrels, old age, and death. He discusses related idioms and epigrams and their evolution from prewar to present.

Hoggart identifies the sayings and special nuances of the English working-class people that have made them identifiable as such, from the rude and obscene to the intellectual and imaginative. Hoggart also examines the areas of tolerance, local morality, and public morality, elaborating on current usage of words that have evolved from the fourteen through the eighteenth centuries. He touches on religion, superstition, and time, the beliefs that animate language. And finally, he focuses on aphorisms and social change and the emerging idioms of relativism, concluding that many early adages still in use seem to refuse to die.

With inimitable verve and humor, Hoggart offers adages, apothegms, epigrams and the like in this colorful examination drawn from the national pool and the common culture. This volume will interest scholars and general readers interested in culture studies, communications, and education.

Richard Hoggart was educated at Leeds University. Later, as professor of modern English literature at Birmingham University, he founded the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies. He has authored or edited twenty-seven books, including Between Two Worlds: Politics, Anti-Politics, and the Unpolitical, The Uses of Literacy, and The Tyranny of Relativism, all available from Transaction.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.