PHP Reference: Beginner to Intermediate PHP5

Mario Lurig
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A collection of over 250 PHP functions with clear explanations in language anyone can understand, followed with as many examples as it takes to understand what the function does and how it works. This book includes numerous additional tips, the basics of PHP, MySQL query examples, regular expressions syntax, and two indexes to help you find information faster: a common language index and a function index. When the internet is not around or you want a simpler explanation along with all the technical details, this book has all of that and more.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Mario Lurig
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Published on
Apr 30, 2008
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Pages
164
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ISBN
9781435715905
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / General
Computers / Programming / Object Oriented
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Here is a book that takes the sting out of learning object-oriented design patterns! Using vignettes from the fictional world of Harry Potter, author Avinash C. Kak provides a refreshing alternative to the typically abstract and dry object-oriented design literature.

Designing with Objects is unique. It explains design patterns using the short-story medium instead of sterile examples. It is the third volume in a trilogy by Avinash C. Kak, following Programming with Objects (Wiley, 2003) and Scripting with Objects (Wiley, 2008). Designing with Objects confronts how difficult it is for students to learn complex patterns based on conventional scenarios that they may not be able to relate to. In contrast, it shows that stories from the fictional world of Harry Potter provide highly relatable and engaging models. After explaining core notions in a pattern and its typical use in real-world applications, each chapter shows how a pattern can be mapped to a Harry Potter story. The next step is an explanation of the pattern through its Java implementation. The following patterns appear in three sections: Abstract Factory, Builder, Factory Method, Prototype, and Singleton; Adapter, Bridge, Composite, Decorator, Facade, Flyweight, and Proxy; and the Chain of Responsibility, Command, Interpreter, Iterator, Mediator, Memento, Observer, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. For readers’ use, Java code for each pattern is included in the book’s companion website.

All code examples in the book are available for download on a companion website with resources for readers and instructors. A refreshing alternative to the abstract and dry explanations of the object-oriented design patterns in much of the existing literature on the subject. In 24 chapters, Designing with Objects explains well-known design patterns by relating them to stories from the fictional Harry Potter series
Professional Scala provides experienced programmers with fast track coverage aimed at supporting the use of Scala in professional production applications. Skipping over the basics and fundamentals of programming, the discussion launches directly into practical Scala topics with the most up-to-date coverage of the rapidly-expanding language and related tools. Scala bridges the gap between functional and object-oriented programming, and this book details that link with clear a discussion on both Java compatibility and the read-eval-print loop used in functional programming. You'll learn the details of tooling for build and static analysis. You’ll cover unit testing with ScalaTest, documentation with Scaladoc, how to handle concurrency, and much more as you build the in-demand skill set required to use Scala in a real-world production environment.

Java-compliant with functional programming properties, Scala's popularity is growing quickly—especially in the rapidly expanding areas of big data and cluster computing. This book explains everything professional programmers need to start using Scala and its main tools quickly and effectively.

Master Scala syntax, the SBT interactive build tool, and the REPL workflow

Explore functional design patterns, concurrency, and testing Work effectively with Maven, Scaladoc, Scala.js, and more Dive into the advanced type system Find out about Scala.js

A working knowledge of Scala puts you in demand. As both the language and applications expand, so do the opportunities for experienced Scala programmers—and many positions are going unfilled. Twitter, Comcast, Netflix, and other major enterprises across industries are using Scala every day, in a number of different applications and capacities. Professional Scala helps you update your skills quickly to start advancing your career.

A Student Guide to Object-Oriented Development is an introductory text that follows the software development process, from requirements capture to implementation, using an object-oriented approach. The book uses object-oriented techniques to present a practical viewpoint on developing software, providing the reader with a basic understanding of object-oriented concepts by developing the subject in an uncomplicated and easy-to-follow manner. It is based on a main worked case study for teaching purposes, plus others with password-protected answers on the web for use in coursework or exams. Readers can benefit from the authors' years of teaching experience.

The book outlines standard object-oriented modelling techniques and illustrates them with a variety of examples and exercises, using UML as the modelling language and Java as the language of implementation. It adopts a simple, step by step approach to object-oriented development, and includes case studies, examples, and exercises with solutions to consolidate learning. There are 13 chapters covering a variety of topics such as sequence and collaboration diagrams; state diagrams; activity diagrams; and implementation diagrams.

This book is an ideal reference for students taking undergraduate introductory/intermediate computing and information systems courses, as well as business studies courses and conversion masters' programmes.

Adopts a simple, step by step approach to object-oriented developmentIncludes case studies, examples, and exercises with solutions to consolidate learningBenefit from the authors' years of teaching experience
As the application of object technology--particularly the Java programming language--has become commonplace, a new problem has emerged to confront the software development community. Significant numbers of poorly designed programs have been created by less-experienced developers, resulting in applications that are inefficient and hard to maintain and extend. Increasingly, software system professionals are discovering just how difficult it is to work with these inherited, "non-optimal" applications. For several years, expert-level object programmers have employed a growing collection of techniques to improve the structural integrity and performance of such existing software programs. Referred to as "refactoring," these practices have remained in the domain of experts because no attempt has been made to transcribe the lore into a form that all developers could use. . .until now. In Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code, renowned object technology mentor Martin Fowler breaks new ground, demystifying these master practices and demonstrating how software practitioners can realize the significant benefits of this new process.

With proper training a skilled system designer can take a bad design and rework it into well-designed, robust code. In this book, Martin Fowler shows you where opportunities for refactoring typically can be found, and how to go about reworking a bad design into a good one. Each refactoring step is simple--seemingly too simple to be worth doing. Refactoring may involve moving a field from one class to another, or pulling some code out of a method to turn it into its own method, or even pushing some code up or down a hierarchy. While these individual steps may seem elementary, the cumulative effect of such small changes can radically improve the design. Refactoring is a proven way to prevent software decay.

In addition to discussing the various techniques of refactoring, the author provides a detailed catalog of more than seventy proven refactorings with helpful pointers that teach you when to apply them; step-by-step instructions for applying each refactoring; and an example illustrating how the refactoring works. The illustrative examples are written in Java, but the ideas are applicable to any object-oriented programming language.

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