Puswhisperer: A Year in the Life of an Infectious Disease Doctor

Bitingduck Press LLC
1
Free sample

 H1N1. Staph aureus. Traveler’s diarrhea. All examples of human interaction with the microbial world, which counts viruses, bacteria, and parasites too numerous to mention. Infectious Disease doctor Mark Crislip has a strange relationship with this world—he spends most of his time trying to kill it, even as he appreciates the vital role microorganisms play in the Earth’s ecosystems. 
Puswhisperer is a collection of infectious disease anecdotes created from a year’s worth of clinical blog posts from the Medscape blog Rubor, Dolor, Calor, Tumor. Originally intended for residents and fellows, the posts have been compiled, edited, and revised for a non-specialist audience. The tales cover a wide range of diagnostic dilemmas and treatment quandaries. Which infection smells like buttered popcorn? Are some antibiotics “stronger” than others? Is it OK to eat the oysters?

Along with clinical insight, the book provides a good dose of humor and insightful, microbe-centered philosophy. The author speculates on what the Earth might look like in five billion years, when animals and plants are gone, but bacteria remain. He also draws attention to the staggering rate of evolution in bacteria, made possible by short generation times and passing of genetic material from one bug to another. Finding a 60-year-old Staph strain in an old wound, Crislip tells us, is like looking out your window and seeing a Neanderthal shuffle by.

Recommended for anyone interested in infectious disease and the microorganisms that run our planet. 
Read more

About the author

 Mark Crislip has been practicing Infectious Diseases in Portland, Oregon since 1990. He writes for Medscape, with a popular blog entitled Rubor, Dolor, Calor, Tumor. He is an editor and writer for the Science-Based Medicine. He edited a 12 volume e-book collection of the SBM blog entries, available on Amazon, Nook and iTunes. He produces three highly rated medical podcasts, the Puscast, Gobbet o' Pus and the Quackcast which won the People's Choice Podcast Award for best Health and Fitness podcast three years in a row. He produces the The ID Compendium, a popular Infectious Disease iPhone/Android reference application. He is also the President of the Society for Science-Based Medicine.

 
Read more
5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Bitingduck Press LLC
Read more
Published on
Jan 31, 2015
Read more
Pages
368
Read more
ISBN
9781938463631
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Medical / Diagnosis
Medical / Essays
Medical / Infectious Diseases
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
 A carefully selected and edited compendium of the best of Dr. Mark Crislip (the Puswhisperer)’s blog posts from sciencebasedmedicine.org. The sections have been edited for redundancy, updated for 2017, and classified into themes.
Supplements and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (SCAM) can be classified many ways; generally speaking, alternative remedies are:

Possible: mostly botanicals and herbal remedies. There is nothing impossible that a given plant product will affect a given disease, although often the provenance of a given herbal treatment is suspect.

Impossible: the rest of CAM. It will be equally impossible to cover every CAM practice, so just a few are treated in depth.

The book is classified as follows:

What’s the Harm? A general discussion of why SCAM is bad for people, animals, and the environment.

Alt-Facts: Why Scientific Thinking is Hard. A discussion of how and why our powers of logic are often powerless against SCAM.

Counting to Ten: Statistics for the Rest of Us. A somewhat technical section about statistical errors and fallacies, and why interpreting the literature is difficult even for clinicians. A must-read for lovers of math.

Realm of the Possible. A discussion of supplements, including the evolution of my thinking on probiotics.

Rectum? Damn Near Killed ‘Em. Probiotics and the Gut Microbiome

Herbs and Supplements

Eliminate the Impossible. Impossible treatments, their fallacies and risks.

Chiropractic

Homeopathy

Acupuncture

Miscellaneous Quack Remedies

Vaccines and Flu Woo. The fallacies behind anti-vaccination beliefs, and why you should always get your flu shot.
A brilliant and courageous doctor reveals, in gripping accounts of true cases, the power and limits of modern medicine.

Sometimes in medicine the only way to know what is truly going on in a patient is to operate, to look inside with one's own eyes. This book is exploratory surgery on medicine itself, laying bare a science not in its idealized form but as it actually is -- complicated, perplexing, and profoundly human.

Atul Gawande offers an unflinching view from the scalpel's edge, where science is ambiguous, information is limited, the stakes are high, yet decisions must be made. In dramatic and revealing stories of patients and doctors, he explores how deadly mistakes occur and why good surgeons go bad. He also shows us what happens when medicine comes up against the inexplicable: an architect with incapacitating back pain for which there is no physical cause; a young woman with nausea that won't go away; a television newscaster whose blushing is so severe that she cannot do her job. Gawande offers a richly detailed portrait of the people and the science, even as he tackles the paradoxes and imperfections inherent in caring for human lives.

At once tough-minded and humane, Complications is a new kind of medical writing, nuanced and lucid, unafraid to confront the conflicts and uncertainties that lie at the heart of modern medicine, yet always alive to the possibilities of wisdom in this extraordinary endeavor.

Complications is a 2002 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.

The New York Times bestselling author of Complications examines, in riveting accounts of medical failure and triumph, how success is achieved in a complex and risk-filled profession

The struggle to perform well is universal: each one of us faces fatigue, limited resources, and imperfect abilities in whatever we do. But nowhere is this drive to do better more important than in medicine, where lives are on the line with every decision. In his new book, Atul Gawande explores how doctors strive to close the gap between best intentions and best performance in the face of obstacles that sometimes seem insurmountable.

Gawande's gripping stories of diligence, ingenuity, and what it means to do right by people take us to battlefield surgical tents in Iraq, to labor and delivery rooms in Boston, to a polio outbreak in India, and to malpractice courtrooms around the country. He discusses the ethical dilemmas of doctors' participation in lethal injections, examines the influence of money on modern medicine, and recounts the astoundingly contentious history of hand washing. And as in all his writing, Gawande gives us an inside look at his own life as a practicing surgeon, offering a searingly honest firsthand account of work in a field where mistakes are both unavoidable and unthinkable.

At once unflinching and compassionate, Better is an exhilarating journey narrated by "arguably the best nonfiction doctor-writer around" (Salon). Gawande's investigation into medical professionals and how they progress from merely good to great provides rare insight into the elements of success, illuminating every area of human endeavor.

 A carefully selected and edited compendium of the best of Dr. Mark Crislip (the Puswhisperer)’s blog posts from sciencebasedmedicine.org. The sections have been edited for redundancy, updated for 2017, and classified into themes.
Supplements and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (SCAM) can be classified many ways; generally speaking, alternative remedies are:

Possible: mostly botanicals and herbal remedies. There is nothing impossible that a given plant product will affect a given disease, although often the provenance of a given herbal treatment is suspect.

Impossible: the rest of CAM. It will be equally impossible to cover every CAM practice, so just a few are treated in depth.

The book is classified as follows:

What’s the Harm? A general discussion of why SCAM is bad for people, animals, and the environment.

Alt-Facts: Why Scientific Thinking is Hard. A discussion of how and why our powers of logic are often powerless against SCAM.

Counting to Ten: Statistics for the Rest of Us. A somewhat technical section about statistical errors and fallacies, and why interpreting the literature is difficult even for clinicians. A must-read for lovers of math.

Realm of the Possible. A discussion of supplements, including the evolution of my thinking on probiotics.

Rectum? Damn Near Killed ‘Em. Probiotics and the Gut Microbiome

Herbs and Supplements

Eliminate the Impossible. Impossible treatments, their fallacies and risks.

Chiropractic

Homeopathy

Acupuncture

Miscellaneous Quack Remedies

Vaccines and Flu Woo. The fallacies behind anti-vaccination beliefs, and why you should always get your flu shot.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.