Basic Texas Birds: A Field Guide

University of Texas Press
Free sample

Finding all the birds in Texas can be a lifetime pursuit. Basic Texas Birds, an easy-to-use field guide, will help you identify over 180 species of birds that are found across the state, including a selection of the rarer "Texas specialties" that draw birders to Texas from around the world. These are the birds that form the basis of a birder's life list for Texas.

Basic Texas Birds is organized by bird families to aid in identifying any bird you see in the wild. It is loaded with resources, including:

  • 200 full-color, close-up photos of the birds
  • State-of-the-art range maps—the most accurate of any currently available—that show each species' distribution within the state
  • Up-to-date species accounts that provide a wealth of current and historical information, including each bird's appearance, habitat, status, and distribution, and that also identify similar species
  • A glossary of terms used in bird identification
  • A list of selected readings for learning more about birds found in Texas
  • The Texas Ornithological Society's list of birds documented in Texas

Much more convenient for identifying common birds than a comprehensive state or national field guide, Basic Texas Birds is a must-have resource for both beginning and experienced birders.

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About the author

MARK LOCKWOOD, of Alpine, Texas, is a conservation biologist in the State Parks Division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. One of the state’s leading ornithologists, he is also the secretary of the Texas Birds Records Committee of the Texas Ornithological Society and a member of the American Birding Association’s checklist committee.

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Texas Press
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Published on
Jan 1, 2010
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Pages
419
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ISBN
9780292793187
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Birdwatching Guides
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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On September 6, 2007, an African Grey parrot named Alex died prematurely at age thirty-one. His last words to his owner, Irene Pepperberg, were "You be good. I love you."

What would normally be a quiet, very private event was, in Alex's case, headline news. Over the thirty years they had worked together, Alex and Irene had become famous—two pioneers who opened an unprecedented window into the hidden yet vast world of animal minds. Alex's brain was the size of a shelled walnut, and when Irene and Alex first met, birds were not believed to possess any potential for language, consciousness, or anything remotely comparable to human intelligence. Yet, over the years, Alex proved many things. He could add. He could sound out words. He understood concepts like bigger, smaller, more, fewer, and none. He was capable of thought and intention. Together, Alex and Irene uncovered a startling reality: We live in a world populated by thinking, conscious creatures.

The fame that resulted was extraordinary. Yet there was a side to their relationship that never made the papers. They were emotionally connected to one another. They shared a deep bond far beyond science. Alex missed Irene when she was away. He was jealous when she paid attention to other parrots, or even people. He liked to show her who was boss. He loved to dance. He sometimes became bored by the repetition of his tests, and played jokes on her. Sometimes they sniped at each other. Yet nearly every day, they each said, "I love you."

Alex and Irene stayed together through thick and thin—despite sneers from experts, extraordinary financial sacrifices, and a nomadic existence from one univer­sity to another. The story of their thirty-year adventure is equally a landmark of scientific achievement and of an unforgettable human-animal bond.

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