Spaces of Sustainability: Geographical Perspectives on the Sustainable Society

Routledge
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Spaces of Sustainability is an engaging and accessible introduction to the key philosophical ideas which lie behind the principles of sustainable development. This topical resource discusses key contemporary issues including global warming, third world poverty, transnational citizenship and globalization.

Combining the latest research and theoretical frameworks Spaces of Sustainability offers a unique insight into contemporary attempts to create a more sustainable society and introduces the debates surrounding sustainable development through a series of interesting transcontinental case studies. These include: discussions of land-use conflicts in the USA; agricultural reform in the Indian Punjab; environmental planning in the Barents Sea; community forest development in Kenya; transport policies in Mexico City; and political reform in Russia.

Written in an approachable and concise manner, this is essential reading for students of geography, planning, environmental politics and urban studies. It is illustrated throughout with figures and plates, along with a range of explanatory help boxes and useful web links.

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About the author

Mark Whitehead is a lecturer in human geography at the Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Jan 24, 2007
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Pages
242
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ISBN
9781134246366
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Earth Sciences / Geography
Social Science / General
Social Science / Human Geography
Social Science / Sociology / Urban
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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