The Man in the Street

Troubador Publishing Ltd
Free sample

Britain, 1930s. Tony Cox, out-of-work, finds himself swept up in a wave of right-wing activism - mass rallies, charismatic leadership and public violence. Rising through the ranks of the British Union of Fascists, he is interned at the outbreak of the Second World War. Upon his release, Tony reinvents himself, burying his history from everyone, including the one person who truly loves him: his grandson. But when a violent secret from the past emerges, Tony’s world is brought crashing down around him.
Britain, 1990s. David Coxon-Dyet looks up to Tony. He knows nothing about his secret past, but as his personal life collapses and David is faced with redundancy and economic insecurity, the terrible truth about his grandfather is revealed.
Betrayed by the actions of others, both grandfather and grandson take extreme measures to wrest back control. For these men in the street the consequences are profound.
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About the author

Having worked in senior roles in television, radio and online for the BBC and Channel 4, former journalist Martin Howe finds an escape in writing literary fiction. His debut novel, White Linen, was published by Matador in November 2018. He lives in St Albans, Hertfordshire.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Troubador Publishing Ltd
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Published on
May 28, 2019
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Pages
200
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ISBN
9781838599058
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / General
Fiction / War & Military
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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In this gripping story of betrayal by friends, family and the church, Martin Howe explores the relationship between individuals and a society which holds moral codes of behaviour in high regard. White Linen exposes the corrupting influence such constraints can have at all levels of society and on many of the people concerned.
Set in Dublin in the mid-1990s, the action centres on the closure of the last remaining ‘Magdalen Laundry’, where women who had transgressed moral boundaries were sent. The book follows four of the ‘Magdalen women’ who have spent the best part of their lives confined there and working for no pay. Readers join the women as they have their final drink at the local bar before going their separate ways. The emotions of leaving prompt the women to reminisce, revealing profoundly shocking secrets which fundamentally change everything they believed about themselves and their so-called friends. Relationships that have endured for decades are fractured, new bitter-sweet alliances are briefly formed, and everyone emerges in a different light. It all comes together in a surprising revelatory ending.
White Linen is about ageing and the compromises that are made with a painful past that appears to grow more alluring over time. The narrative deals uncompromisingly the imperfections of memory, but is also a testament to the resilience of the human spirit. Above all, the novel tells of the moral hypocrisy and the appalling treatment of women by society, sanctioned by the religious establishment of the time.
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In an enthralling new historical novel from national bestselling author Kate Quinn, two women—a female spy recruited to the real-life Alice Network in France during World War I and an unconventional American socialite searching for her cousin in 1947—are brought together in a mesmerizing story of courage and redemption.

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