Italian Humanist Photography from Fascism to the Cold War

Bloomsbury Publishing
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Spanning four decades of radical political and social change in Italy, this interdisciplinary study explores photography's relationship with Italian painting, film, literature, anthropological research and international photography.

Evocative and powerful, Italian social documentary photography from the 1930s to the 1960s is a rich source of cultural history, reflecting a time of dramatic change. This book shows, through a wide range of images (some published for the first time) that to fully understand the photography of this period we must take a more expansive view than scholars have applied to date, considering issues of propaganda, aesthetics, religion, national identity and international influences.

By setting Italian photography against a backdrop of social documentary and giving it a distinctive place in the global history of photography, this exciting volume of original research is of interest to art historians and scholars of Italian and visual culture studies.
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About the author

Martina Caruso is Associate Lecturer in Photography and Contemporary Media Cultures, University of the Arts, London, UK. She also co-directs the Giulio Turcato Archives in Rome, Italy.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Sep 22, 2016
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Pages
232
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ISBN
9781474246965
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / History / Contemporary (1945-)
Art / History / Modern (late 19th Century to 1945)
History / Europe / General
History / Europe / Italy
Photography / General
Photography / History
Photography / Photojournalism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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