Women & Power: A Manifesto

Liveright Publishing
7
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A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

"A modern feminist classic."—The Guardian

From the internationally acclaimed classicist and New York Times best-selling author comes this timely manifesto on women and power. 

At long last, Mary Beard addresses in one brave book the misogynists and trolls who mercilessly attack and demean women the world over, including, very often, Mary herself. In Women & Power, she traces the origins of this misogyny to its ancient roots, examining the pitfalls of gender and the ways that history has mistreated strong women since time immemorial. As far back as Homer’s Odyssey, Beard shows, women have been prohibited from leadership roles in civic life, public speech being defined as inherently male. From Medusa to Philomela (whose tongue was cut out), from Hillary Clinton to Elizabeth Warren (who was told to sit down), Beard draws illuminating parallels between our cultural assumptions about women’s relationship to power—and how powerful women provide a necessary example for all women who must resist being vacuumed into a male template. With personal reflections on her own online experiences with sexism, Beard asks: If women aren’t perceived to be within the structure of power, isn’t it power itself we need to redefine? And how many more centuries should we be expected to wait?
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About the author

A professor of classics at Cambridge University, Mary Beard is the author of the best-selling SPQR and Women & Power and the National Book Critics Circle Award–nominated Confronting the Classics. A popular blogger and television personality, Beard is a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Liveright Publishing
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Published on
Dec 12, 2017
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Pages
128
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ISBN
9781631494765
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Women
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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