Always Eat Dessert...: and 6 More Weight Loss and Lifestyle Habits I Learned in the Convent

Post Hill Press
Free sample

When I entered the convent, I was eighteen, heavyset, and lacking self-confidence. I planned to stay forever, living an idealistic life devoted to God. Perhaps deep down I was looking for one solution to all of life’s decisions and ambiguities while forging ahead despite parental disapproval. But the years I spent in the convent transformed me in many ways. Without “dieting” at all, I practiced time-tested weight management principles because that’s just part of convent life. Dinner was a predetermined portion of a predetermined food. The only thing that kept me from being ravenously hungry was dessert.

 

Eventually I left the convent—and fifty pounds—behind. I have never regained those pounds, because my life changed.

 

The “Convent Diet” really isn’t a diet at all. It is a way of looking at food and dealing with life. Food becomes a friend instead of an enemy. Negative diets, full of “do nots” and “should nots” may work for a short time, but they cannot last a lifetime.

 

The Convent Diet works for everyone because it’s about creating your own personal diet. The key to losing weight and keeping it off is to make your eating plan your own. The Convent Diet is neither trendy nor a magic bullet, and for most it takes some trial and error, but it works!

 

Even now, fifty years later, I still eat dessert every day. However, there are three musts for success with The Convent Diet:

·      Determination: to create good habits and to establish and practice a routine

·      Tenacity: to stick with it and start again, as many times as is necessary

·      Ability to face stress: to stare down “the elephant in the room” created by our times

I call my tips the “Seven Holy Habits”: visualization, always eat dessert, don’t count calories (but calories count), it’s okay to be a couch potato, don’t diet while eating out, forget “fake” food, and take time for yourself.

 

It worked for me. It will work for you too. 

Read more

About the author

Mary Lou Reid entered the convent as a girl of eighteen. While there she lost 50 pounds and has kept the weight off for 50 years. Here she shares her lifelong lessons learned in the convent that led to losing and keeping off the 50 pounds. After leaving the convent Mary Lou headed to New York where she worked in the arts and media business. She attended NYU business school and then relocated to Los Angeles where she completed her education in finance. Mary Lou has worked as a Certified Financial Planner for the past 30 years. She has given many seminars, written articles, and has appeared as a financial expert on TV. 

Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Post Hill Press
Read more
Published on
Apr 17, 2018
Read more
Pages
394
Read more
ISBN
9781682616680
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Health & Fitness / Diet & Nutrition / Weight Loss
Religion / Christian Life / Personal Growth
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
"I read this book... it worked. My autoimmune disease is gone and I'm 37 pounds lighter in my pleather." --Kelly Clarkson

Most of us have heard of gluten—a protein found in wheat that causes widespread inflammation in the body. Americans spend billions of dollars on gluten-free diets in an effort to protect their health. But what if we’ve been missing the root of the problem? In The Plant Paradox, renowned cardiologist Dr. Steven Gundry reveals that gluten is just one variety of a common, and highly toxic, plant-based protein called lectin. Lectins are found not only in grains like wheat but also in the “gluten-free” foods most of us commonly regard as healthy, including many fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, and conventional dairy products. These proteins, which are found in the seeds, grains, skins, rinds, and leaves of plants, are designed by nature to protect them from predators (including humans). Once ingested, they incite a kind of chemical warfare in our bodies, causing inflammatory reactions that can lead to weight gain and serious health conditions.

At his waitlist-only clinics in California, Dr. Gundry has successfully treated tens of thousands of patients suffering from autoimmune disorders, diabetes, leaky gut syndrome, heart disease, and neurodegenerative diseases with a protocol that detoxes the cells, repairs the gut, and nourishes the body. Now, in The Plant Paradox, he shares this clinically proven program with readers around the world.

The simple (and daunting) fact is, lectins are everywhere. Thankfully, Dr. Gundry offers simple hacks we easily can employ to avoid them, including:

Peel your veggies. Most of the lectins are contained in the skin and seeds of plants; simply peeling and de-seeding vegetables (like tomatoes and peppers) reduces their lectin content.Shop for fruit in season. Fruit contain fewer lectins when ripe, so eating apples, berries, and other lectin-containing fruits at the peak of ripeness helps minimize your lectin consumption.Swap your brown rice for white. Whole grains and seeds with hard outer coatings are designed by nature to cause digestive distress—and are full of lectins.

With a full list of lectin-containing foods and simple substitutes for each, a step-by-step detox and eating plan, and delicious lectin-free recipes, The Plant Paradox illuminates the hidden dangers lurking in your salad bowl—and shows you how to eat whole foods in a whole new way.

Thousands of books have been written about the latest and greatest diets that will help people lose weight and improve health. But a key element in any successful nutritional health program is a tried-and-true method that most people haven't thought about—yet it could be revolutionary for taking health to the next level. This ancient secret is fasting.

Fasting is not about starving oneself. When done right, it's an incredibly effective therapeutic approach that produces amazing results regardless of diet plan. In fact, Toronto-based nephrologist Dr. Jason Fung has used a variety of fasting protocols with more than 1,000 patients, with fantastic success. In "The Complete Guide to Fasting" he has teamed up with international bestselling author and veteran health podcaster Jimmy Moore to explain what fasting is really about, why it's so important, and how to fast in a way that improves health. Together, they make fasting as a therapeutic approach both practical and easy to understand.

The Complete Guide to Fasting explains:

• why fasting is actually good for health

• who can benefit from fasting (and who won't)

• the history of fasting

• the various ways to fast: intermittent, alternate-day, and extended fasting

• what to expect when starting to fast

• how to track progress while fasting

• the weight loss effects of fasting

• how to ward off potential negative effects from fasting

The book also provides tools to help readers get started and get through their fasts, including a 7-Day Kick-Start Fasting Plan and healing liquid recipes.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.