How to Innovate: The Essential Guide for Fearless School Leaders

Teachers College Press
2
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As the authors state, “Without rethinking how, what, when, where, and why we are teaching, technology will merely be an expensive way of making the existing system faster and flashier.” In How to Innovate, Mary Moss Brown and Alisa Berger—founding co-principals of the NYC iSchool—applytheir extensive on-the-ground experience to demonstrate a radically different approach to school transformation. They introduce a scalable model of how schools can and should redefine themselves to better meet the needs of 21st-century students. Using a framework built around four critical levers for school change—curriculum, culture, time, and human capital—the NYC iSchool model merges the teaching of big ideas and valuable skills with the realities of accountability, academic preparation, and adolescent development.The bookincludes more than 20 activities that will help educators begin the process of school transformation, whether they want to focus on a single program, one area of change, or engage in a full-scale whole school improvement effort. This accessible, practical, and inspiring resource is designed to be used over and over again, in any context, despite the constantly changing climates in which schools operate.

“Reimagining school and creating more schools like the iSchool must be our highest national priority. All students need to graduate from high school and college ‘innovation-ready,’ as well as prepared for the complex challenges of continuous learning and citizenship in the 21st century. Time is running short. I urge you to read this book with urgency.”
—From the Foreword by Tony Wagner, expert in residence at the Harvard University Innovation Lab, founder and co-director of the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

"Public education mistakenly relies on a 19-century model to teach kids in the 21st century. Moss Brown and Berger decided to change this by opening the iSchool in New York City and creating a whole new approach to how schools work. They succeeded wildly, and having walked the walk, they now talk the talk so others can follow on the trail they blazed.”
Joel Klein, former Chancellor of the New York City Department of Education (2002–2011)

“Those who strive to create or transform a school will learn much from the shining example of these two fearless principals. As learning contexts change with the rising tides of technology, Moss and Berger focus above all on human and intellectual growth in schools. Their NYC iSchool offers hope for increasing imagination, equity, and depth in the face of the gathering storm of standardization.”
Kathleen Cushman, co-founder of What Kids Can Do and author ofThe Motivation Equation

“Moss Brown and Berger launched one of the first schools to blend personalized instruction and community-connected engaging projects. Anyone interested in a picture of next-generation learning and the inside story of creating a great school should read this book.”
Tom Van der Ark, CEO of Getting Smart


Mary Moss Brown and Alisa Berger are the founding co-principals of the NYC iSchool and are currently working as the founding partners in Novare Schools, a consulting group that focuses on school leader coaching, school design, innovation, and transformation.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Teachers College Press
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Published on
Dec 4, 2014
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Pages
123
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ISBN
9780807772805
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Administration / School Superintendents & Principals
Education / Computers & Technology
Education / Leadership
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Every early care and education program deserves a qualified and competent supervisor. This pioneering text continues to address the special needs of administrators and staff to help them expand and improve their supervisory skills. The first to provide guidelines and practical suggestions for staff training and development in early childhood settings, this classic volume is still the best choice for those supervising staff from a wide variety of educational and cultural backgrounds. In this twentieth anniversary edition, updated to reflect the many changes that have taken place in the field, you’ll find: A new chapter on career ladders/lattices. A new chapter on staff selection, recruitment, and orientation. Promising staff development and evaluation practices that emphasize staff learning and reflection. Continued attention to issues of diversity. Relevant NAEYC accreditation criteria at the end of selected chapters. Emphasis on the development of supervisors, as well as staff members. A focus on collaborative relationships and dialogue.

“This book captures the unique aspects of supervision in the early childhood setting like no other.”
—Susan Washburn, Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA

Praise for Previous Editions!
“Specific strategies are offered not only on how to design and implement staff development, but also on how a supervisor can continue to improve her or his own skills.”
—Young Children

“The authors present practical guidelines for supervisors on the job or in training to work with teachers in day care centers, nursery schools, Head Start programs, school kindergartens, or the primary grades.”
—Journal of Curriculum & Supervision

“This thorough publication . . . should be a welcome addition to the school management collection of both the professor and practitioner.”
—Educational Leadership

What will it take for urban schools to achieve the kind of academic performance required by new state and national educational standards? How can classroom teachers in city schools help to close the achievement gap? What can restore public confidence in public schools?

Pedro Noguera argues that higher standards and more tests, by themselves, will not make low-income urban students any smarter and the schools they attend more successful without substantial investment in the communities in which they live. Drawing on extensive research performed in San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and Richmond, Noguera demonstrates how school and student achievement is influenced by social forces such as demographic change, poverty, drug trafficking, violence, and social inequity. Readers get a detailed glimpse into the lives of teachers and students working "against the odds" to succeed. Noguera sends a strong message to those who would have urban schools “shape up or shut down”: invest in the future of these students and schools, and we can reach the kind of achievement and success that typify only more privileged communities.

Public schools are the last best hope for many poor families living in cities across the nation. Noguera gives politicians, policymakers, and the public its own standard to achieve—provide the basic economic and social support so that teachers and students can get the job done!

“In this engaging book, Pedro Noguera provides a compelling vision of the problems plaguing urban schools and how to address them. City Schools and the American Dream is replete with insights from a scholar and former activist who makes great use of both personal and professional experiences.”
—William Julius Wilson, Harvard University

The science behind the traits and quirks that drive creative geniuses to make spectacular breakthroughs
What really distinguishes the people who literally change the world--those creative geniuses who give us one breakthrough after another? What differentiates Marie Curie or Elon Musk from the merely creative, the many one-hit wonders among us?
Melissa Schilling, one of the world's leading experts on innovation, invites us into the lives of eight people--Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin, Elon Musk, Dean Kamen, Nikola Tesla, Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, and Steve Jobs--to identify the traits and experiences that drove them to make spectacular breakthroughs, over and over again. While all innovators possess incredible intellect, intellect alone, she shows, does not create a breakthrough innovator. It was their personal, social, and emotional quirkiness that enabled true genius to break through--not just once but again and again.
Nearly all of the innovators, for example, exhibited high levels of social detachment that enabled them to break with norms, an almost maniacal faith in their ability to overcome obstacles, and a passionate idealism that pushed them to work with intensity even in the face of criticism or failure. While these individual traits would be unlikely to work in isolation--being unconventional without having high levels of confidence, effort, and goal directedness might, for example, result in rebellious behavior that does not lead to meaningful outcomes--together they can fuel both the ability and drive to pursue what others deem impossible.
Schilling shares the science behind the convergence of traits that increases the likelihood of success. And, as Schilling also reveals, there is much to learn about nurturing breakthrough innovation in our own lives--in, for example, the way we run organizations, manage people, and even how we raise our children.
Why can some organizations innovate time and again, while most cannot?

You might think the key to innovation is attracting exceptional creative talent. Or making the right investments. Or breaking down organizational silos. All of these things may help—but there’s only one way to ensure sustained innovation: you need to lead it—and with a special kind of leadership. Collective Genius shows you how.

Preeminent leadership scholar Linda Hill, along with former Pixar tech wizard Greg Brandeau, MIT researcher Emily Truelove, and Being the Boss coauthor Kent Lineback, found among leaders a widely shared, and mistaken, assumption: that a “good” leader in all other respects would also be an effective leader of innovation. The truth is, leading innovation takes a distinctive kind of leadership, one that unleashes and harnesses the “collective genius” of the people in the organization.

Using vivid stories of individual leaders at companies like Volkswagen, Google, eBay, and Pfizer, as well as nonprofits and international government agencies, the authors show how successful leaders of innovation don’t create a vision and try to make innovation happen themselves. Rather, they create and sustain a culture where innovation is allowed to happen again and again—an environment where people are both willing and able to do the hard work that innovative problem solving requires.

Collective Genius will not only inspire you; it will give you the concrete, practical guidance you need to build innovation into the fabric of your business.
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