Papa Cado (New, Enlarged Third Edition): What an Ordinary Man Learned On His Extraordinary Journey Through Life

Orca Publishing Company
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WHAT AN ORDINARY MAN LEARNED ON HIS EXTRAORDINARY JOURNEY THROUGH LIFE.

PAPA CADO is the extraordinarily touching, sometimes hilarious, first-person journey of a humble man named Arthur Mercado, who arguably holds the unofficial Guinness Book of Records title for the most combined heart-procedures, 51, without actually dying.

Arthur's journal, based entirely on his life, and uniquely written in "Arthur speak," reveals a man who has confronted all of God's "little" tests head on, including the premature deaths of Dad, Mom and Brother James at 41, 57, and 32 respectively,

Despite his heart issues, his continuing battle with Parkinson's, and a bout with prostate Cancer, Arthur raised his only daughter, Mindy, as a single dad, and has become a role model and inspiration for everyone he's touched.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Orca Publishing Company
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Published on
Mar 11, 2014
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Pages
326
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ISBN
9780985991807
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Health & Fitness / Health Care Issues
Self-Help / Motivational & Inspirational
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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From the Hardcover edition.
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