Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest

Indiana University Press
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From the birds who wake us in the morning with their cheerful chorus to those who flock to our feeders and brighten a gloomy winter day, birds fascinate us with their lively and interesting behavior and provide essential services from controlling pest populations to pollinating crops. And yet for all the benefits they provide, many species across Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio are in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat, agricultural expansion, changing forest conditions, and interactions with humans.

In Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest, Matt Williams profiles forty of the most beautiful and interesting birds who winter, breed, or migrate through the Midwest and whose populations are most in danger of disappearing from the region. Each profile includes the current endangered status of the species, a description of the bird's vocal and nesting patterns, and tips to help readers identify them, along with stunning color images and detailed migration maps.

An exquisite and timely examination of our feathered friends, Endangered and Disappearing Birds of the Midwest is a call to action to protect these vulnerable and gorgeous creatures that enliven our world.

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About the author

Matt Williams is Director of Conservation Programs at the Nature Conservancy, where he has worked for more than 16 years, and is a specialist in prescribed fire and endangered species management. He is author and photographer of Indiana State Parks: A Centennial Celebration and photographer of The Complete Guide to Indiana State Parks.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Indiana University Press
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Published on
Aug 1, 2018
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9780253036094
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Animals / Birds
Nature / Endangered Species
Nature / Environmental Conservation & Protection
Nature / Reference
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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