Caccia all'oro: Vecchie e nuove monete per il futuro

Chi ha investito in oro all’inizio del nuovo millennio ha moltiplicato il suo capitale molto più che mettendo i suoi soldi nei più ovvi impieghi alternativi in dollari. Non può sorprendere che sia ripartita, e da tempo, la caccia all’oro. In questi ultimi anni è sembrato un modo efficace per proteggere la ricchezza, mentre l’euro e il dollaro perdevano valore e credibilità agli occhi di molti. Tanto che quelli che gli autori definiscono fondamentalisti dell’oro propongono di tornare ad agganciare a esso le monete. Ma questa sarebbe una soluzione o invece pura follia come sostengono molti economisti, secondo i quali si ritroverà un equilibrio nel sistema attuale? Gli autori considerano sbagliate entrambe le ipotesi.
Read more

About the author

Matthew Bishop è American Business Editor e capo della redazione di New York di The Economist. Ha insegnato alla London Business School e spesso commenta le questioni economiche alla radio e alla televisione, tra l’altro su CNBC, CNN e BBC.

Michael Green è economista e scrittore. Già alto funzionario del governo britannico, è stato consulente in materia di finanza globale e ha insegnato economia nell’Università di Varsavia.

Read more

Reviews

Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
EGEA spa
Read more
Published on
Feb 12, 2013
Read more
Pages
156
Read more
ISBN
9788823874404
Read more
Language
Italian
Read more
Genres
Business & Economics / Money & Monetary Policy
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Michael Green
When the United States Army Signal Corps created the Aeronautical Division in August 1907, it had a mission ‘to take charge of all matters pertaining to military ballooning, air machines, and all kindred matters.’ That small inconsequential portion of the US Army would grow progressively over the many decades to become a separate service named the US Air Force in 1947 following the Second World War. Overnight, it became the world’s most powerful military establishment, able to deliver conventional and nuclear ordnance anywhere around the globe. Today’s cutting-edge example of this power-projection is the supersonic, bat-winged B-2 Spirit stealth bomber, which can fly at an altitude of 50,000 feet, and is built of carbon-graphite composite materials. The B-2 Spirit is a far cry from the early days of the service when it relied on fragile prop-driven wood and fabric aerial platforms, such as the Wright Type B, which could barely reach an altitude of 100 feet. In between have been such iconic Second World War aircraft as the P-51 Mustang and P-47 Thunderbolt fighters and bombers such as the B-25 Mitchell, B-17 Flying Fortress and B-29 Super Fortress which dropped the first A-Bomb in 1945. The Cold War demanded ever more powerful aircraft, such as the B-58 Hustler and B-52 Stratofortress, and fighters including the F-86 Sabre, F-104 Starfighter and F-4 Phantom. All these aircraft and more are vividly illustrated and described in detail in this superb Images of War publication.
Michael Green
When the United States Army Signal Corps created the Aeronautical Division in August 1907, it had a mission ‘to take charge of all matters pertaining to military ballooning, air machines, and all kindred matters.’ That small inconsequential portion of the US Army would grow progressively over the many decades to become a separate service named the US Air Force in 1947 following the Second World War. Overnight, it became the world’s most powerful military establishment, able to deliver conventional and nuclear ordnance anywhere around the globe. Today’s cutting-edge example of this power-projection is the supersonic, bat-winged B-2 Spirit stealth bomber, which can fly at an altitude of 50,000 feet, and is built of carbon-graphite composite materials. The B-2 Spirit is a far cry from the early days of the service when it relied on fragile prop-driven wood and fabric aerial platforms, such as the Wright Type B, which could barely reach an altitude of 100 feet. In between have been such iconic Second World War aircraft as the P-51 Mustang and P-47 Thunderbolt fighters and bombers such as the B-25 Mitchell, B-17 Flying Fortress and B-29 Super Fortress which dropped the first A-Bomb in 1945. The Cold War demanded ever more powerful aircraft, such as the B-58 Hustler and B-52 Stratofortress, and fighters including the F-86 Sabre, F-104 Starfighter and F-4 Phantom. All these aircraft and more are vividly illustrated and described in detail in this superb Images of War publication.
Michael Green
When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, the U.S. Navy had a total of 111 submarines. However, this fleet was not nearly as impressive as the number suggests. It was mostly a collection of aging boats from the late teens and early twenties, with only a few of the newer, more modern Gato-class boats. Fortunately, with the war in Europe was already two years old and friction with Japan ever-increasing, help from what would become known as the Silent Service in the Pacific was on the way: there were 73 of the new fleet submarines under construction.

The Silent Service in World War II tells the story of America’s intrepid underwater warriors in the words of the men who lived the war in the Pacific against Japan. The enemy had already begun to deploy advanced boats, but the U.S. was soon able to match them. By 1943 the new Gato-class boats were making a difference, carrying the war not just to the Japanese Imperial Navy, but to the vital merchant fleet that carried the vast array of materiel needed to keep the land of the Rising Sun afloat.

As the war progressed, American success in the Solomons, starting with Guadalcanal, began to constrict the Japanese sea lanes, and operating singly or in wolfpacks they were able to press their attacks on convoys operating beyond the range of our airpower, making daring forays even into the home waters of Japan itself in the quest for ever more elusive targets. Also taking on Japanese warships, as well as rescuing downed airmen (such as the grateful first President Bush), U.S. submarines made an enormous contribution to our war against Japan.

This book takes you through the war as you learn what it was like to serve on submarines in combat, the exhilaration of a successful attack, and the terror of being depth-charged. And aside from enemy action, the sea itself could prove to be an extremely hostile environment as many of these stories attest. From early war patrols in obsolescent, unreliable S-boats to new, modern fleet submarines roving the Pacific, the forty-six stories in this anthology give you a full understanding of what it was like to be a U.S. Navy submariner in combat.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.