A Breed Apart

Speaking Volumes
Free sample

A Novel of Wild Bill Hickok

Aces and eights—everyone knows the tale of the Dead Man's Hand. Wild Bill Hickok was a giant in a vast land, a celebrity in the days of dime novels and the telegraph. Few men in the Old West could fill his boots, but fewer still knew the real story, the making of a legend.

To history, he was Wild Bill, but he came of age as James Butler Hickok. After his first showdown at the age of twenty-four, everyone could see that Hickok was a breed apart. As a green hand on the Overland Stage, he bravely faced off against a band of thieves. During the Civil War, he displayed nerve and savvy as a Union spy. And on one afternoon in the town square of Springfield, Missouri, Wild Bill Hickok wrote himself into the history books—with a revolver in his hand.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Max McCoy is an award-winning author and journalist. He's written four original Indiana Jones adventures for Lucasfilm, the critically acclaimed thriller The Moon Pool, and the Hellfire western noir trilogy. Damnation Road, the last book in the trilogy, won the 2011 Spur Award from the Western Writers of America for Best Novel. Hellfire Canyon, the first book in the trilogy, also won the Spur and was named a Kansas Notable Book. Max wrote the novelization for Steven Spielberg's epic miniseries, Into the West. His books have been published by Random House, Simon and Schuster, and Kensington. He teaches at Emporia State University. Praise for Max McCoy “McCoy at his best, proving himself once again as a master of his craft.” —USA Today Best-selling Author Ralph Cotton (A Breed Apart) "Not only has McCoy captured Twain's voice with consummate skill, his account of Jesse's life is more compelling than the outlaw's manufactured legend. A brilliantly crafted look at two of our best-known icons." —Fred Bean, author of Black Gold and Eden (Jesse)
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Speaking Volumes
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 31, 2006
Read more
Collapse
Pages
247
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781628155143
Read more
Collapse
Features
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Fiction / Westerns
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
THE DEAD MAN’S JOURNEY—Journada del Muerte, the locals called it: the blistering ocean of sand and sage between the Rio Grande River to the west and the Sacramento mountain range to the east. The bones of men and horses had bleached in the mile-high desert for three hundred years. Spanish conquistadors were the first white men to explore this new furnace of the Southeastern New Mexico Territory—and the first to perish. In the thin air, the riders coming down the mountain were sharply etched against the blue sky. Steam, blowing out of the ice-encrusted nostrils of their mounts and their two pack horses, surrounded the horsemen in a white veil. Descending the eastern face of the Sacramento mountains, the horses walked slowly and painfully on cracked hooves. The icy earth offered only a steep path paved with shards of glass; blood seeped around well-worn iron horseshoes.

When the riders looked to the sky, they saw that the white sun would stay high enough for them to make Fort Stanton, ten miles into the valley. The riders knew the trail since boyhood. Words were not wasted in country where a man’s mouth would crack and bleed like his horse’s hooves. Beyond the fort lay the clapboard settlement of Lincoln.

When Grady Rourke died, his sons, Sean, Patrick, and Liam, came back to claim the family land . . .
What was left of it.

It was January, 1878, when the Rourke brothers came back to this hard and dangerous land. They thought they were coming home. What they didn’t know was that they were about to become part of a vicious struggle for power. And that they would be forced to choose sides with either John Tunstall and Alexander McSween or J. J. Dolan and Sheriff William Brady. The battle would quickly become the infamous Lincoln County War—a dirty little war with no rules, no heroes, and no happy endings.

Douglas Savage, the acclaimed author of Cedar City Rendezvous and Highpockets has taken the historical facts surrounding the Lincoln County War and its fascinating characters, and fashioned one of the most readable and revealing tales of the American frontier.
McCoy is a master of his craft. --Ralph Cotton, USA Today bestselling author

In the Old West, legends die hard--and so do witnesses. But that won't stop psychic-turned-detective Ophelia Wylde from finding fresh graves, digging up clues, and catching wanted criminals--with a little help from the dead. . .

Dead Men Tell No Lies

The Civil War is over, and many a young widow has turned to spiritualism to contact their husbands on "the other side." But Ophelia Wylde won't be fooled twice. After wasting her money on a phoney psychic, she decides if she can't beat 'em, join 'em. She leaves New Orleans and heads West, selling her services as a spiritual medium who speaks to the dead. By the time she reaches Dodge City, business is booming. Except for a handsome but skeptical bounty hunter named Jack Calder, no one suspects Ophelia of running a con game--until an unfortunate "reading" of a girl who's still living exposes her to a townfull of angry customers. As punishment, the mob drags Ophelia to Boot Hill and buries her alive in a fresh grave overnight. That's when the dead start speaking. To her. For real. And for dead people, they've got lots to say. . .

"An entertaining romp with quirky characters that would make Mark Twain proud. McCoy has a gift for capturing the Old West in all its colorful and outrageous glory. I couldn't put this imaginative page-turner down." --Margaret Coel, author of Buffalo Bill's Dead Now

"Tightly drawn characters, a vile villain. . .satisfying. . .a compelling read." --Publisher's Weekly on The Moon Pool
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.