Biopesticides and Bioagents: Novel Tools for Pest Management

CRC Press
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Insects, diseases, and weeds cause an almost 30% yield loss per annum in agricultural production, resulting in an increased consumption of pesticides by 20% per annum throughout the world. This comprehensive volume looks at the status of biopesticides and biocontrol agents in agriculture. It will be a critically important reference work, providing basic facts and studies on new and current discoveries of the role of biopesticides and bioagents in integrated pest management (IPM). The book contains four main sections, covering
  • the status of biopesticides and biocontrol agents in agriculture
  • plant health-promoting biocontrol agents
  • parasitoids and predators
  • genetically modified crops and Bacillus thuringiensis, and phytochemicals in biocontrol

The volume provides information regarding new advances in microbial, biochemical, and genetically modified and organic nanoparticles in integrated pest management.

Biopesticides and Bioagents: Novel Tools for Pest Management

should find a prominent place on the shelves of agriculture and plant scientists, microbiologists, biotechnologists, plant pathologists and entomologists working in academic and commercial agrichemical situations, and in the libraries of all research establishments and companies where this exciting subject is researched, studied, or taught.
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About the author

Md. Arshad Anwer, PhD, is currently Assistant Professor-cum-Jr. Scientist in the Department of Plant Pathology at Bihar Agricultural University (BAU), Sabour-Bhagalpur, Bihar, India. He is engaged in developing low-cost biopesticides that have increased shelf life. His areas of interest include the development of preliminary information of economically important pathogens associated with maize and the ability to recognize key diseases and their hot spots through survey and surveillance of major crops under agro-ecological condition. He is also working on panama wilt of banana and host specificity of plant pathogen, evaluation of biocontrol agents against wilts of several crops, and establishment of sick-plots for studies on several soil borne plant pathogens. He is associated with more than eight research groups at BAU, Sabour, including maize research team, viz. organic farming, host parasite research groups, bacteriology, mycology research group, biopesticides and bio-fertilizer research groups.

He teaches undergraduate as well as postgraduate students and has published 24 peer-reviewed research papers including one book and seven book chapters, mostly in publications from the USA, UK and Italy.

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Additional Information

Publisher
CRC Press
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Published on
Sep 27, 2017
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Pages
402
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ISBN
9781315341415
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / General
Science / Life Sciences / Botany
Technology & Engineering / Agriculture / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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