The Treasure of the Santa Ritas

Xlibris Corporation
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Seventeen-year-old Matt Bowden is convinced that his uncle didn't commit suicide.  Matt believes his favorite uncle's murder has something to do with the book he was writing about Southwest mines and treasures.  Matt is determined to find out who killed Uncle Jonas and why.

Matt returns to his uncle's house and searches for a clue.  He copies all of his uncle's computer files on the new book he was writing and also finds a phone message from a man named Art Fogle, a university history professor.  Matt soon learns that Fogle was killed in a hit-and-run accident, only hours before Matt found his murdered uncle.  Just a coincidence, or is there a connection between Art Fogle's and Uncle Jonas' deaths?

Matt asks the soon-to-retire homicide detective, John Pawlowski, for help.  From his uncle's files, Matt learns that Uncle Jonas borrowed a valuable Spanish document--alluding to a fortune in gold and silver--from a Mrs. Garcia.  Matt goes to see the Mexican woman and meets her granddaughter, Susan Martinez.  With his uncle dead and the Spanish document missing, Matt agrees to help Susan find her grandmother's treasure document.

The trail leads Matt and Susan to a man named Phil Simpson, a local authority on Southwest mines and treasures.  After their visit, Simpson dies mysteriously, when his house burns down.  Detective John Pawlowski is now convinced that all three deaths are tied to the missing Spanish document.

All Matt, Susan and John have to do now is stay one step ahead of the killer and find the Spanish treasure before anyone else is murdered.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Xlibris Corporation
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Published on
Apr 25, 2001
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Pages
137
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ISBN
9781462825127
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Mystery & Detective / General
Juvenile Fiction / Mysteries & Detective Stories
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Whether responding to a CNN.com survey or voting for the NFL All-Pro team, computer users are becoming more and more comfortable with Internet polls. Computer use in the United States continues to grow—more than half of all American households now have a personal computer. The next question, then, becomes obvious. Should Americans be able to use the Internet in the most important polls of all? Some advocates of Internet voting argue that Americans are well suited to casting their ballots online in political elections. They are eager to make use of new technology, and they have relatively broad access to the Internet. Voting would become easier for people stuck at home, at the office, or on the road. Internet voting might encourage greater political participation among young adults, a group that stays away from the polling place in droves. It would hold special appeal for military personnel overseas, whose ability to vote is a growing concern. There are serious concerns, however, regarding computer security and voter fraud, unequal Internet access across socioeconomic lines (the "digital divide"), and the civic consequences of moving elections away from schools and other polling places and into private homes and offices. After all, showing up to vote is the most public civic activity many Americans engage in, and it is often their only overt participation in the democratic process. In Point, Click, and Vote, voting experts Michael Alvarez and Thad Hall make a strong case for greater experimentation with Internet voting. In their words, "There is no way to know whether any argument regarding Internet voting is accurate unless real Internet voting systems are tested, and they should be tested in small-scale, scientific trials so that their successes and failures can be evaluated." In other words, you never know until you try, and it's time to try harder. The authors offer a realistic plan for putting pilot remote Internet voting programs into effect nationwide. Such programs would allow U.S. voters in selected areas to cast their ballots over any Internet connection; they would not even need to leave home. If these pilot programs are successful, the next step is to consider how they might be implemented on a larger scale in future elections.
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