The Countrey Justice: Conteyning the Practise of the Justices of the Peace Out of Their Sessions, Gathered for the Better Helpe of Such Justices of Peace as Have Not Beene Much Conversant in the Studie of the Lawes of this Realme

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Dalton, Michael. The Countrey Justice, Conteyning the Practice of the Justices of the Peace out of their Sessions. Gathered for the Better Helpe of Such Justices of Peace as Have Not Beene Much Conversant in the Studie of the Lawes of this Realme. London: Printed for the Societie of Stationers, 1618. [xi], 370, [xiii] pp. Folio. 9" x 12." Reprinted 2003 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 2002041103. ISBN 1-58477-299-9. Cloth. $125. * Reprint of the rare first edition. This venerable early English justice of the peace manual went through some twenty editions between 1618 and 1746. Rooted in Crompton, Fitzherbert and Lambard, The Countrey Justice offers advice on such matters as customs, highways, prisons, riots, soldiers, murder, felonies, rogues and vagabonds, wool, and high treason. It is also noteworthy for originating an alphabetically arranged topical structure which was adopted in later texts.
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Publisher
The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
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Published on
Dec 31, 2003
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Pages
370
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ISBN
9781584772996
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Civil Procedure
Law / Legal Profession
Law / Reference
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This content is DRM protected.
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The publication in 1999 of Paths to Justice presented the results of the most wide-ranging survey of public use of and attitudes towards the civil justice system ever conducted in England and Wales by either an independent body or government
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