Slavery, Smallholding and Tourism: Social Transformations in the British Virgin Islands

Quid Pro Books
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SLAVERY, SMALLHOLDING AND TOURISM explores the political economy of development in the British Virgin Islands -- from plantations, through the evolution of a smallholding economy, to the rise of tourism. The study argues that the demise of plantation economy in the BVI ushered in a century of imperial disinterest persisting until recently, when a new 'monocrop' -- tourism -- became ascendant. Using an historical and anthropological approach, O'Neal reveals that the trend toward reliance on tourism and other dependent industries echoes for many BVIslanders -- the 'Belongers' -- their heritage. Part of the Classic Dissertation Series from Quid Pro Books, the book adds a new Foreword by Vassar's Colleen Ballerino Cohen and additional commentary by UC-Irvine's Bill Maurer, who shows how even the emergence of a financial services industry may be understood through the insights that O'Neal presents in his study. Quality eBook formatting features active Contents, linked notes, original tables and maps, and Index.
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About the author

MICHAEL E. O’NEAL, Ph.D., is Senior Research Fellow at Island Resources Foundation, an organization with offices in Washington, D.C. and the Caribbean, whose central mission is to assist small islands to meet the challenges of social, economic and institutional growth while protecting and enhancing their environments. Former President of the H. Lavity Stoutt Community College, in the British Virgin Islands, O’Neal had previously served as the first Resident Tutor/Head of the University of the West Indies, BVI Centre. From 1997-2004, he held appointment as Core Professor at the Graduate College of the Union Institute in Ohio, where he supervised doctoral students in interdisciplinary studies.

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Additional information

Publisher
Quid Pro Books
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Published on
21 Feb 2012
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Pages
235
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ISBN
9781610271196
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Language
English
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Genres
History / World
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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