The Roots of Rough Justice: Origins of American Lynching

University of Illinois Press
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In this deeply researched prequel to his 2006 study Rough Justice: Lynching and American Society, 1874–1947, Michael J. Pfeifer analyzes the foundations of lynching in American social history. Scrutinizing the vigilante movements and lynching violence that occurred in the middle decades of the nineteenth century on the Southern, Midwestern, and far Western frontiers, The Roots of Rough Justice: Origins of American Lynching offers new insights into collective violence in the pre-Civil War era. Pfeifer examines the antecedents of American lynching in an early modern Anglo-European folk and legal heritage. He addresses the transformation of ideas and practices of social ordering, law, and collective violence in the American colonies, the early American Republic, and especially the decades before and immediately after the American Civil War. His trenchant and concise analysis anchors the first book to consider the crucial emergence of the practice of lynching of slaves in antebellum America. Pfeifer also leads the way in analyzing the history of American lynching in a global context, from the early modern British Atlantic to the legal status of collective violence in contemporary Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. Seamlessly melding source material with apt historical examples, The Roots of Rough Justice tackles the emergence of not only the rhetoric surrounding lynching, but its practice and ideology. Arguing that the origins of lynching cannot be restricted to any particular region, Pfeifer shows how the national and transatlantic context is essential for understanding how whites used mob violence to enforce the racial and class hierarchies across the United States.
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About the author

Michael Pfeifer is an associate professor of history at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY, and the author of Rough Justice: Lynching and American Society, 1874–1947.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Illinois Press
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Published on
Apr 1, 2011
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Pages
176
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ISBN
9780252093098
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Language
English
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Genres
History / General
History / United States / 19th Century
Social Science / Criminology
Social Science / Discrimination & Race Relations
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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