Drinking with the Saints: The Sinner's Guide to a Holy Happy Hour

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Pub crawl your way through the sacred seasons with this entertaining and useful collection of cocktail recipes, distilled spirits, beer, and wine for virtually every occasion on the Catholic liturgical calendar. One part bartender's guide, one part spiritual manual, a dash of irreverence, and mixed with love: Drinking with the Saints is a work that both sinner and saint will savor.

You may think you're savy on saintly drinking, but did you know:
  • Beer may have been invented by the ancient Egyptians, but it was perfected in medieval monasteries?
  • The méthode champenoise was invented by a Benedictine monk whose name now adorns one of the world’s finest champagnes: Dom Pérignon. According to the story, when he sampled his first batch, Pérignon cried out to his fellow monks: “Brothers, come quickly. I am drinking stars!”
  • Whiskey was invented by Irish monks, who probably shared their knowledge with the Scots during their missions. Whiskey was first prescribed medicinally as a cure for “paralysis of tongue,” and apparently it works: no Irishman since has ever been accused of having a paralyzed tongue.
  • Chartreuse, the world’s most magical liqueur, was perfected by Carthusian monks and is still made by them. Only two monks at a time know the recipe.
  • The California wine industry began when Blessed Junípero Serra and his Franciscan brethren brought the first wine grapes to the region. And its rebirth in Napa County after Prohibition was thanks in large part to a chemistry teacher and LaSalle Christian Brother named Brother Timothy...
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About the author

Michael P. Foley was born and raised in Southern California, went to school in Northern California, and did his graduate work at Boston College, where he earned his PhD in Catholic theology. Foley taught for three years at Notre Dame and then took a job in the Great Texts at Baylor University, where he has lived for the past ten years with his wife and six children.

His previous works include Ever Ancient, Ever New: Ruminations on the City, the Soul, and the Church; Wedding Rites: The Complete Guide to Traditional Vows, Music, Ceremonies, Blessings, and Interfaith Services; a translation of St. Augustine’s Confessions; and the popular Why Do Catholics Eat Fish on Friday?: The Catholic Origin to Just About Everything. Foley has also authored over 150 articles on subjects ranging from faith to film to Church history.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
May 4, 2015
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Pages
487
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ISBN
9781621573838
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Christianity / Saints & Sainthood
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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One of Publishers Weekly's Best Books of the Year

Winner of a Christopher Award

Winner of a Catholic Press Association Book Award
Meet some surprising friends of God in this warm and wonderful memoir
James Martin has led an entirely modern life: from a lukewarm Catholic childhood, to an education at the Wharton School of Business, to the executive fast track at General Electric, to ministry as a Jesuit priest, to a busy media career in Manhattan. But at every step he has been accompanied by some surprising friends—the saints of the Catholic Church. For many, these holy men and women remain just historical figures. For Martin, they are intimate companions. "They pray for me, offer me comfort, give me examples of discipleship, and help me along the way," he writes.
The author is both engaging and specific about the help and companionship he has received. When his pride proves trouble­some, he seeks help from Thomas Merton, the monk and writer who struggled with egotism. In sickness he turns to Thérèse of Lisieux, who knew about the boredom and self-pity that come with illness. Joan of Arc shores up his flagging courage. Aloysius Gonzaga deepens his compassion. Pope John XXIII helps him to laugh and not take life too seriously.
Martin's inspiring, witty, and always fascinating memoir encompasses saints from the whole of Christian history— from St. Peter to Dorothy Day. His saintly friends include Francis of Assisi, Ignatius of Loyola, Mother Teresa, and other beloved figures. They accompany the author on a lifelong pilgrimage that includes stops in a sunlit square of a French town, a quiet retreat house on a New England beach, the gritty housing projects of inner-city Chicago, the sprawling slums of Nairobi, and a gorgeous Baroque church in Rome. This rich, vibrant, stirring narrative shows how the saints can help all of us find our way in the world.
"In a cross between Holden Caulfield and Thomas Merton, James Martin has written one of the best spiritual memoirs in years."
—Robert Ellsberg, author of All Saints
"It isn't often that a new and noteworthy book comes along in this genre, but we have reason to celebrate My Life with the Saints. It is earmarked for longevity. It will endure as an important and uncommon contribution to religious writing."
—Doris Donnelly, America
"An account . . . that is as delightful as it is instructive."
—First Things
"In delightful prose Martin recounts incidents, both perilous and funny, that have prompted him to turn to the saints, and in doing so shows us a new way of living out a devotion that is as old and universal as the Church."
—Avery Cardinal Dulles, SJ, Fordham University
"An outstanding and often hilarious memoir."
—Publishers Weekly
"Martin's final word for us is as Jungian as it is Catholic: God does not want us to be like Mother Teresa or Dorothy Day. God wants us to be most fully ourselves."
—The Washington Post Book World
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