Black Fridays: A Novel

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One of Booklist's "Year's Best Crime Novels"

After two years in federal prison, Jason Stafford is no longer welcome on Wall Street. But due to his financial crime expertise, one firm wants him to quietly look for irregularities in the books of one of their junior traders, whose body was just pulled from the Long Island Sound.

Raising an autistic five-year-old alone, Stafford can’t refuse the lucrative offer. The job is supposed to last two weeks, tops. But soon he’s facing threats and intimidation, and more people are dying. Stafford must fight for his life—while struggling to save his son from a different kind of danger…

Nominated for the Edgar® Award for Best First Novel
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About the author

Michael Sears spent more than twenty years on Wall Street, rising to the position of managing director in the bond trading and underwriting divisions of Paine Webber and, later, Jefferies & Company, before leaving the business in 2005. He lives in Sea Cliff, New York, with his wife, artist Barbara Segal, and is at work on a new novel featuring Jason Stafford and his son. 
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Reviews

4.2
26 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
Sep 18, 2012
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Pages
432
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ISBN
9781101600221
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Thrillers / Crime
Fiction / Thrillers / Legal
Fiction / Thrillers / Suspense
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Ken Pelham
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“Texting April” by Parker Francis. Consumer electronics puts a horrifying spin on the traditional ghost story. Text messages will never be the same. Winner of the Royal Palm Literary Award.

“Gabriel” by Melanie Terry Griffey. We’ve all brought home a stray at one time or another, and loved that poor beast as if it were family. Not all strays are what they seem. Winner of the 2010 Flights of Fantasy award.

“The Alexandrite Necklace” by Daco Auffenorde and Robert Rotstein. Vanity, jealousy, and jewelry to die for steer a Hollywood actress on an upward career arc. But every arc must ultimately reach a zenith. A modern retelling of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace.”

“Beating Cats” by John Hope. Addiction preys upon innocence in this dark, disturbing tour of the human psyche, the monsters within us, and the slide into depravity.

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“Die Fabrik (The Factory)” by Charles A. Cornell. In a dieselpunk vision of Nazi Germany, weapons research and genocide become one in a nightmarish, secret factory in this novella.

John Grisham
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Don’t miss an original essay by John Grisham in the back of the book.

John Grisham takes you back to where it all began. One of the most popular novels of our time, A Time to Kill established John Grisham as the master of the legal thriller. Now we return to Ford County as Jake Brigance finds himself embroiled in a fiercely controversial trial that exposes a tortured history of racial tension.
 
Seth Hubbard is a wealthy man dying of lung cancer. He trusts no one. Before he hangs himself from a sycamore tree, Hubbard leaves a new, handwritten will. It is an act that drags his adult children, his black maid, and Jake into a conflict as riveting and dramatic as the murder trial that made Brigance one of Ford County’s most notorious citizens, just three years earlier. The second will raises many more questions than it answers. Why would Hubbard leave nearly all of his fortune to his maid? Had chemotherapy and painkillers affected his ability to think clearly? And what does it all have to do with a piece of land once known as Sycamore Row?

Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader’s Circle for author chats and more.
 
Praise for Sycamore Row
 
“Powerful . . . immensely readable . . . the best of his books.”—The Washington Post
 
“Welcome back, Jake. . . . [Brigance] is one of the most fully developed and engaging characters in all of Grisham’s novels.”—USA Today
 
“One of [Grisham’s] finest . . . Sycamore Row is a true literary event.”—The New York Times Book Review


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Ken Pelham
 The twelve stories comprising In Shadows Written: An Anthology of Modern Horror takes us into the hearts and minds of thirteen award-winning authors. Explore the wide reach of horror fiction of the early 21st century.

“Familiar” by Ken Pelham. Is it research or witchcraft? Science or magic? A young Bostonian discovers the connection between her disintegrating marriage and a mysterious accident on the dark wet highway to Salem.

“The Legend of Johnny Bell” by Elle Andrews Patt. Ah, Johnny Bell. His heart is in the right place, but he’s not the sharpest machete in the zombie apocalypse. Finally, an author has found a good use for Pomeranians.

“The Antiquary’s Wife” by William Burton McCormick. Folk legend, prejudice, and suspicion haunt a young American couple traveling the Ukrainian countryside of the 19th century. This novelette was a Finalist for the prestigious Derringer Award.

“Kev” by Michael Sears. Two boys out on a late-night lark, looking for thrills, a little breaking and entering. You take into account the things that could go wrong but forget that the world has real-life flesh and blood monsters among its vast web of living things.

“Insecurity Complex” by Jade Kerrion. What’s a self-respecting ghost to do when everyone is so over-entertained with their gadgets and personal electronics? Short, sweet, and funny. Winner of the Royal Palm Literary Award.

“A Dream Within A Dream” by Bria Burton. Our memories and realities are shaped by that which we need to be true. A young girl struggles through family tragedy in this haunting story inspired by Edgar Allan Poe.

“Texting April” by Parker Francis. Consumer electronics puts a horrifying spin on the traditional ghost story. Text messages will never be the same. Winner of the Royal Palm Literary Award.

“Gabriel” by Melanie Terry Griffey. We’ve all brought home a stray at one time or another, and loved that poor beast as if it were family. Not all strays are what they seem. Winner of the 2010 Flights of Fantasy award.

“The Alexandrite Necklace” by Daco Auffenorde and Robert Rotstein. Vanity, jealousy, and jewelry to die for steer a Hollywood actress on an upward career arc. But every arc must ultimately reach a zenith. A modern retelling of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace.”

“Beating Cats” by John Hope. Addiction preys upon innocence in this dark, disturbing tour of the human psyche, the monsters within us, and the slide into depravity.

“Three Two One, Wake Up” by M.J. Carlson. Science fiction in the tradition of Philip K. Dick meets horror in the tradition of Jack Finney and H.P. Lovecraft. Are your friends and neighbors really who you think? Are you better off not knowing?

“Die Fabrik (The Factory)” by Charles A. Cornell. In a dieselpunk vision of Nazi Germany, weapons research and genocide become one in a nightmarish, secret factory in this novella.

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