Historical Dictionary of Australian Aborigines

Historical Dictionaries of Peoples and Cultures

Book 11
Scarecrow Press
Free sample

The Australian Aborigines first arrived on the continent at least 60,000 years ago. They almost certainly landed on the northwest coast by sea from the nearby islands of the Indonesian archipelago. That first arrival may have been replicated many times over. The following exploration and settlement of a vast and varied continent was a venture of heroic proportions. The new settlers had reached southern Tasmania, the point farthest from the original landfall at least 30,000 years ago. By the early 17th century, when the first European seafarers arrived in Australian waters, the Aboriginal nations were living in every part of the continent, having colonized the tropical rainforests of the north, the vast arid deserts of the interior, and the cool and damp woodlands of the southeast.

The Historical Dictionary of Australian Aborigines relates the history of Australia's indigenous inhabitants from their arrival on the continent 60,000 years ago to the centuries long European colonization process starting in the 1600s to their role in today's Australia. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, an extensive bibliography, and over 300 cross-referenced dictionary entries on significant persons, places, events, institutions, and aspects of culture, society, economy, and politics. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Australian Aboriginal peoples.
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About the author

Mitchell Rolls is senior lecturer and co-director at the Riawunna, Centre for Aboriginal Studies, University of Tasmania, and he is also co-director of the interdisciplinary research centre at the Centre for Colonialism and Its Aftermath.

Murray Johnson is a University Medal recipient from the University of Queensland. He has taught numerous undergraduate and postgraduate courses on Australian history at the University of Queensland, the Australian National University, and the University of Tasmania. He has also been involved in Aboriginal Native Title claims in Queensland.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Scarecrow Press
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Published on
Dec 29, 2010
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Pages
244
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ISBN
9780810874756
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Australia & New Zealand
History / Oceania
History / Reference
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The approximately 150,000 Inuit are indigenous to four nations - Denmark (Greenland), Canada, the United States (Alaska), and Russia - and thus have had very different colonial experiences and participate as citizens of those nations in different ways. Far from being victims of colonialism, Inuit are actively involved in shaping their social environments. Nonetheless, modern social and political realities present Inuit with many of the same issues faced by distinct peoples around the world. This volume describes how Inuit as a single people, citizens of separate nations, and residents of individual communities deal with education, language rights, self-government and self determination, the militarization of their lands and their lives, climate change and pollution, and globalization. This work presents an overview of the Inuit peoples of the Circumpolar North. Unlike other works that focus on traditional Inuit cultures, this work documents the social, political, and economic history of Inuit as part of a globalized world. The work contains information on traditional Inuit cultures, but special emphasis is placed on the recent history of Inuit communities. More than 450 dictionary entries cover issues of society, economy, and politics; influential educators and writers, environmentalists, and politicians; and the many voluntary associations and governmental agencies that have played a role in Inuit history. The introductory essay, chronology, and well-developed bibliography make this an ideal reference source for the researcher or student.
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