KHAKI MISCHIEF: The Agra Murder Case

Neil Wilson Publishing
2
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Memsahibs weren't supposed to murder their husbands. Freemasons weren't supposed to murder their Brothers. Over tiffin and tea, on the verandah, in the Club, all British India gossiped about the shocking trials of the Englishwoman and her doctor-lover, who was part-Indian. Augusta Fullam had committed the sin that dared not speak its name - letting the side down. Recognised as a truly classic crime, the Fullam-Clark case, a double murder emanating from a passionate love affair, has never before been fully studied; in Molly Whittington-Egan, a qualified solicitor blessed with a keen sense of farce, Augusta Fullam has found a biographer able to interpret and evoke not only the tragedies and the legal ramifications of the case, but also the complexities of the characters involved - Clark, the rogue constantly hovering on the borders of denunciation and disgrace; Augusta, the shallow, self-indulgent temptress who attracted retribution through her own vanity. Daughter of a respected Bengal River Pilot, Augusta was a bored wife and mother when, in 1909, she met Henry Clark, a doctor with a wife and five children of his own. Five years later, both couples were dead, and the children scattered to foster homes and live hidden from the glare of publicity. In between lay the years of secret assignations and of a correspondence heavy with passion and the dark undercurrents of a ruthless conspiracy. Rich in the atmosphere of the Raj at the height of its powers, Khaki Mischief is indispensable to collectors of true crime, it remedies the omission of the case from the Notable British Trials series and is also a model of clarity on its demonstration of the Indian Penal Code. Above all, it will be enjoyed for its powerful evocation of a woman who let sex be her master and transgressed the rules of the Raj.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Neil Wilson Publishing
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Published on
Mar 21, 2014
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Pages
128
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ISBN
9781906000738
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Language
English
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Genres
True Crime / General
True Crime / Murder / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Molly Whittington-Egan
In a small white house by a remote Welsh cove, a 90-year-old woman died, full of secrets, on June 27, 1968. What no-one ever guessed was that the dignified and distant old lady, who kept a liveried chauffeur and bred Bedlington terriers, was a convicted murderess. More than half a century before, in Yokohama, Japan, she had been sentenced to death by hanging for the murder of her husband. Daughter of the Mayor of Glastonbury, and a relative of Winston Churchill, Edith Carew had married unwisely, and, reaching the end of her tether, the 28-year-old wife and mother of two rid herself of her swarthy diplomat husband -- the "dirty dog"Walter -- by poisoning him with arsenic. She was sentenced to death, but escaped the hangman. She was brought back to England and imprisoned alongside the celebrated Victorian murderess, Florence Maybrick. The Carew case has never been properly investigated before and Molly Whittington-Egan now reveals the answers to such puzzles as the identity of the 'woman in black' who bought arsenic from the Japanese chemist; the 'mysterious visitor', who stood crying at the door of the House on the Bluff, and would not give her name; of who wrote the strangely- anonymous letters which said that 'dead men tell no tales, nor dead women either'. Few such notable crimes remain untouched, and, until now it has been one about which no real information was available, and no book about it has been written. The author has succeeded not only in obtaining rare documentation from Japan, providing full data about the arrest and trial in Yokohama, but has also done a massive research job in tracing the hitherto hidden aftermath history of the murderess. She has, too, most unusually found Edith Carew's diary for 1896, the year of the murder. It is miraculously intact.
Molly Whittington-Egan
Tales macabre and tales bizarre. All of them with murder in mind. This is the compendium volume of Molly Whittington-Egan's evocative and highly readable series of murder cases, The Stockbridge Baby Farmer and Scottish Murder Stories. Written in a frequently witty and irreverent style, these stories confirm that while the world has moved on, the human mind still deals with murder in the same old fashioned way with motives which have rarely changed over the years. The 36 tales are: 1. The Stockbridge Baby-Farmer: Jessie King, 1888; 2. 'I am Gall': Peter Queen, 1931; 3. The Half-Mutchkin: Edinburgh Brothel Case, 1823; 4. To the Lighthouse: Robert Dickson, 1960; 5. Mr Kello's Sunday Morning Service: John Kello, 1570; 6. The Whiteinch Atrocities: The McArthur Murder, 1904; Helen and William Harkness, 1921; 7. Death of a Hermit: George Shaw and George Dunn, 1952; 8. The Light-Headed Cutty: Mary Smith; aka 'The Wife o'Denside', 1826; 9. The Postman Knocked: Stanislav Myszka, 1947; 10. Brutality: James Keenan, 1969; 11. Rurality: James Robb, 1849; George Christie, 1852; 12. The Northfield Mystery: Helen and William Watt, 1756; 13. Blue Vitriol: Kate Humphrey, 1830; Anne Inglis, 1795; 14. The Battered Bride: John Adam, 1835; 15. The Babes in the Quarry: Patrick Higgins, 1911; 16. The Poisonous Puddocks: George Thom, 1821; 17. The Tram Ride: Alexander Edmonstone, 1969; 18. The Tooth Fiend: Gordon Hay, 1967; 19. The Icing on the Shortbread: Thomas Mathieson Brown, 1906; 20. The Misted Mountain, The Arran Case, 1889; 21. The German Tea Planter, Broughty Ferry, 1912; 22. The Late Mr Toad, The Musselburgh Case, 1911; 23. 'Oh, Loch Maree!', William Laurie King, Edinburgh, 1924; 24. The Running Girl, Christina Gilmour, 1843; 25. The Travelling Man, Hugh Macleod, 1830; 26. The Naked Ghost, Sgt Arthur Davies, 1749; 27. The Cinderella Syndrome, Bertie Wilcox, 1929; 28. 'Holly Willie', William Bennison, 1850; 29. A Tryst With Dr Smith, The St Fergus Case, 1853; 30. The Wild Geese, the Saunders Case, 1913; 31. The French Schoolmaster's Wife, Eugene Marie Chantrelle, 1878; 32 The Ice-Field, the Arran Stowaways,1868; 33. The Toad in the Tunnel, The Garvie Case, 1968; 34. Bible John, the Barrowland Ballroom Killings, 1968-9; 35. Jock the Ripper, William Henry Bury, 1889; 36 The Quest for Norah, the Farnario Case, 1929. These stories will delight all true-crime buffs looking for strange stories from north of the Border.
Molly Whittington-Egan
Many moons ago, in the high Victorian era, Mrs. Guppy, the famous medium, was enjoying a sparkling success. Over the rooftops of Bloomsbury she sailed, was infused through lathe and plaster, and clambered on to tables in the darkness, magicking down showers of apports. Night after night, once the lights were extinguished, and the damped fires had died in the grates, the séance could begin in plush and mahogany drawing-rooms. The O of her mouth in speaking trances was a portal to the spirit world. Her lidded eyes were flickering sensors. The floating paper trumpets were channels to catch the direct voices of the departed. Curtained cabinets were entrances to the unknown land. There, in the thrilling, breathing gloom, decked out in merging black gown, portly, not ethereal, Mrs Guppy, silently, deftly, tripped her own fantastic dance in little, pointy, soft, boots. Definitely invisible, for none ever spotted her, and very nearly noiseless - once, she set a chandelier a-tinkling - she glided behind the bowed heads of her awestruck sitters, and dispensed upon the table a cornucopia of gifts and symbols, apports, from the spirits; animal, vegetable and mineral. Wings swooped and birds burbled; doves were released. Lights darted and twinkled. Auditory effects, tactile feelings, stroking, prickling, oriental smells, made temporary schizophrenics of solid citizens. She was a sensation. Sadly, though, she was a fake medium, or a cheat, as they called it then, deliberately and in full consciousness employing techniques and devices in order to deceive others that she was in contact with the dead. She was lucky, or exceptionally talented: no lurking sceptic ever managed to expose her, to put up the light prematurely, snatch off a veil, or disclose a mask or waxen body part, as was happening to her rivals. In her palmy days, at the beginnings of the British craze for spiritualism she was a maker of miracles, and her name is still remembered. Her private life, obscured to those who believed in her, was curious, and based on fundamental lies. This is her story, finally brilliantly exposed and researched by criminologist Molly Whittington-Egan. It is the story of a brilliant lifelong conwoman and prestidigitateur.
Molly Whittington-Egan
Tales macabre and tales bizarre. All of them with murder in mind. This is the compendium volume of Molly Whittington-Egan's evocative and highly readable series of murder cases, The Stockbridge Baby Farmer and Scottish Murder Stories. Written in a frequently witty and irreverent style, these stories confirm that while the world has moved on, the human mind still deals with murder in the same old fashioned way with motives which have rarely changed over the years. The 36 tales are: 1. The Stockbridge Baby-Farmer: Jessie King, 1888; 2. 'I am Gall': Peter Queen, 1931; 3. The Half-Mutchkin: Edinburgh Brothel Case, 1823; 4. To the Lighthouse: Robert Dickson, 1960; 5. Mr Kello's Sunday Morning Service: John Kello, 1570; 6. The Whiteinch Atrocities: The McArthur Murder, 1904; Helen and William Harkness, 1921; 7. Death of a Hermit: George Shaw and George Dunn, 1952; 8. The Light-Headed Cutty: Mary Smith; aka 'The Wife o'Denside', 1826; 9. The Postman Knocked: Stanislav Myszka, 1947; 10. Brutality: James Keenan, 1969; 11. Rurality: James Robb, 1849; George Christie, 1852; 12. The Northfield Mystery: Helen and William Watt, 1756; 13. Blue Vitriol: Kate Humphrey, 1830; Anne Inglis, 1795; 14. The Battered Bride: John Adam, 1835; 15. The Babes in the Quarry: Patrick Higgins, 1911; 16. The Poisonous Puddocks: George Thom, 1821; 17. The Tram Ride: Alexander Edmonstone, 1969; 18. The Tooth Fiend: Gordon Hay, 1967; 19. The Icing on the Shortbread: Thomas Mathieson Brown, 1906; 20. The Misted Mountain, The Arran Case, 1889; 21. The German Tea Planter, Broughty Ferry, 1912; 22. The Late Mr Toad, The Musselburgh Case, 1911; 23. 'Oh, Loch Maree!', William Laurie King, Edinburgh, 1924; 24. The Running Girl, Christina Gilmour, 1843; 25. The Travelling Man, Hugh Macleod, 1830; 26. The Naked Ghost, Sgt Arthur Davies, 1749; 27. The Cinderella Syndrome, Bertie Wilcox, 1929; 28. 'Holly Willie', William Bennison, 1850; 29. A Tryst With Dr Smith, The St Fergus Case, 1853; 30. The Wild Geese, the Saunders Case, 1913; 31. The French Schoolmaster's Wife, Eugene Marie Chantrelle, 1878; 32 The Ice-Field, the Arran Stowaways,1868; 33. The Toad in the Tunnel, The Garvie Case, 1968; 34. Bible John, the Barrowland Ballroom Killings, 1968-9; 35. Jock the Ripper, William Henry Bury, 1889; 36 The Quest for Norah, the Farnario Case, 1929. These stories will delight all true-crime buffs looking for strange stories from north of the Border.
Molly Whittington-Egan
In a small white house by a remote Welsh cove, a 90-year-old woman died, full of secrets, on June 27, 1968. What no-one ever guessed was that the dignified and distant old lady, who kept a liveried chauffeur and bred Bedlington terriers, was a convicted murderess. More than half a century before, in Yokohama, Japan, she had been sentenced to death by hanging for the murder of her husband. Daughter of the Mayor of Glastonbury, and a relative of Winston Churchill, Edith Carew had married unwisely, and, reaching the end of her tether, the 28-year-old wife and mother of two rid herself of her swarthy diplomat husband -- the "dirty dog"Walter -- by poisoning him with arsenic. She was sentenced to death, but escaped the hangman. She was brought back to England and imprisoned alongside the celebrated Victorian murderess, Florence Maybrick. The Carew case has never been properly investigated before and Molly Whittington-Egan now reveals the answers to such puzzles as the identity of the 'woman in black' who bought arsenic from the Japanese chemist; the 'mysterious visitor', who stood crying at the door of the House on the Bluff, and would not give her name; of who wrote the strangely- anonymous letters which said that 'dead men tell no tales, nor dead women either'. Few such notable crimes remain untouched, and, until now it has been one about which no real information was available, and no book about it has been written. The author has succeeded not only in obtaining rare documentation from Japan, providing full data about the arrest and trial in Yokohama, but has also done a massive research job in tracing the hitherto hidden aftermath history of the murderess. She has, too, most unusually found Edith Carew's diary for 1896, the year of the murder. It is miraculously intact.
Molly Whittington-Egan
Many moons ago, in the high Victorian era, Mrs. Guppy, the famous medium, was enjoying a sparkling success. Over the rooftops of Bloomsbury she sailed, was infused through lathe and plaster, and clambered on to tables in the darkness, magicking down showers of apports. Night after night, once the lights were extinguished, and the damped fires had died in the grates, the séance could begin in plush and mahogany drawing-rooms. The O of her mouth in speaking trances was a portal to the spirit world. Her lidded eyes were flickering sensors. The floating paper trumpets were channels to catch the direct voices of the departed. Curtained cabinets were entrances to the unknown land. There, in the thrilling, breathing gloom, decked out in merging black gown, portly, not ethereal, Mrs Guppy, silently, deftly, tripped her own fantastic dance in little, pointy, soft, boots. Definitely invisible, for none ever spotted her, and very nearly noiseless - once, she set a chandelier a-tinkling - she glided behind the bowed heads of her awestruck sitters, and dispensed upon the table a cornucopia of gifts and symbols, apports, from the spirits; animal, vegetable and mineral. Wings swooped and birds burbled; doves were released. Lights darted and twinkled. Auditory effects, tactile feelings, stroking, prickling, oriental smells, made temporary schizophrenics of solid citizens. She was a sensation. Sadly, though, she was a fake medium, or a cheat, as they called it then, deliberately and in full consciousness employing techniques and devices in order to deceive others that she was in contact with the dead. She was lucky, or exceptionally talented: no lurking sceptic ever managed to expose her, to put up the light prematurely, snatch off a veil, or disclose a mask or waxen body part, as was happening to her rivals. In her palmy days, at the beginnings of the British craze for spiritualism she was a maker of miracles, and her name is still remembered. Her private life, obscured to those who believed in her, was curious, and based on fundamental lies. This is her story, finally brilliantly exposed and researched by criminologist Molly Whittington-Egan. It is the story of a brilliant lifelong conwoman and prestidigitateur.
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