Local Financial Development and the Aid-Growth Relationship

International Monetary Fund
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With official development assistance (ODA) set to rise as countries strive to meet the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), aid effectiveness remains an important area of development policy. An increasing number of studies support the notion that ODA can contribute to growth in a nonlinear relationship. In this paper, we investigate a new hypothesis regarding this relationship: that deeper financial markets in aid-recipient countries facilitate the management of aid flows, thereby enhancing aid effectiveness. An empirical analysis, using a panel data set, finds robust support for the hypothesis.
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Additional Information

Publisher
International Monetary Fund
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Published on
Dec 1, 2004
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Pages
34
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ISBN
9781452760117
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economics / General
Business & Economics / Economics / Macroeconomics
Business & Economics / International / Economics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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