Mountains of Memories and Myths: The Living History of the National Brotherhood of Skiers

Xlibris Corporation
Free sample

Where did you come from? How did you get here? These questions came from people who had not seen black skiers before. Black people cant endure cold temperatures, is a myth that has been held by Caucasians and some black people. Black skiers enjoy gliding, sliding and riding on the cold and snowy mountains. The myths that black people dont ski and that black people are too lazy to learn will be dispelled. There are countless stories of their experiences on the snowy mountains, their volunteer services, networking, finding love, and the friendships over the years.
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About the author

In 1994, Naomi Bryson became president of the National Brotherhood of Skiers (NBS). She produced a thirty per cent increase in member-clubs and shared her success as a presenter at the International Ski Convention in Salzburg, Germany. Naomi is a member of the Jim Dandy Ski Club (since 1973); a member of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. community service organization and Sisters Across America which supports female golfers. She is a retired State Agency Administrator and author of The Day Snow Turned Black, the beginning history of NBS. This is the living history of NBS.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Xlibris Corporation
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Published on
Sep 15, 2014
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Pages
248
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ISBN
9781499067675
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Language
English
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Genres
Sports & Recreation / Skiing
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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The first full-length study of skiing in the United States, this book traces the history of the sport from its utilitarian origins to its advent as a purely recreational and competitive activity.

During the mid-1800s, inhabitants of frontier mining communities in the Sierra and Rocky mountains used skis for many practical reasons, including mail and supply delivery, hunting, and railroad repair. In some towns skis were so common that, according to one California newspaper, "the ladies do nearly all their shopping and visiting on them."

But it was Norwegian immigrants in the Midwest, clinging to their homeland traditions, who first organized the skisport. Through the founding of local clubs and the National Ski Association, this ethnic group dominated American skiing until the 1930s.

At this time, a wave of German immigrants infused America with the ethos of what we today call Alpine skiing. This type of skiing became increasingly popular, especially in the East among wealthy collegians committed to the romantic pursuit of the "strenuous life." Ski clubs proliferated in towns and on college campuses and specialized resorts cropped up from New England to California. At the same time, skiing became mechanized with tows and lifts, and the blossoming equipment and fashion industries made a business of the sport.

On the eve of World War II, as the book concludes its story, all the elements were in place for the explosion in recreational and competitive skiing that erupted after 1945.

Few stories from the "greatest generation" are as unforgettable -- or as little known -- as that of the 10th Mountain Division. Today a versatile light infantry unit deployed around the world, the 10th began in 1941 as a crew of civilian athletes with a passion for mountains and snow. In this vivid history, adventure writer Peter Shelton follows the unique division from its conception on a Vermont ski hill, through its dramatic World War II coming-of-age, to the ultimate revolution it inspired in American outdoor life.

In the late-1930s United States, rock climbing and downhill skiing were relatively new sports. But World War II brought a need for men who could handle extreme mountainous conditions -- and the elite 10th Mountain Division was born. Everything about it was unprecedented: It was the sole U.S. Army division trained on snow and rock, the only division ever to grow out of a sport. It had an un-matched number of professional athletes, college scholars, and potential officer candidates, and as the last U.S. division to enter the war in Europe, it suffered the highest number of casualties per combat day. This is the 10th's surprising, suspenseful, and often touching story.

Drawing on years of interviews and research, Shelton re-creates the ski troops' lively, extensive, and sometimes experimental training and their journey from boot camp to the Italian Apennines. There, scaling a 1,500-foot "unclimbable" cliff face in the dead of night, they stunned their enemy and began the eventual rout of the German armies from northern Italy.

It was a self-selecting elite, a brotherhood in sport and spirit. And those who survived (including the Sierra Club's David Brower, Aspen Skiing Corporation founder Friedl Pfeifer, and Nike cofounder Bill Bowerman, who developed the waffle-sole running shoe) turned their love of mountains into the thriving outdoor industry that has transformed the way Americans see (and play in) the natural world.
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