The Man Who Tamed Lawrence

Fireside Novels
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The Man Who Tamed Lawrence is an historical fiction tale about a remarkable, Negro police detective who rose to prominence a Lawrence, Kansas in spite of a climate of widespread discrimination and segregation.

In 1890, up and coming, Lawrence, Kansas, Negroes suffered widespread discrimination and segregation. In spite of these challenges, The real Sam Jeans, a Negro, was recruited for the Lawrence Police Department, and later rose to the position of assistant chief of police. The only words written about Sam and his great accomplishments were that he was fearless in danger, showed good police judgment, and knew how to get along with the public. This tale portrays how it might have been for Sam as he overcame the great challenges on the path to success.

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About the author

Napoleon Crews began writing his first manuscript, for publication, in 1990. He was told often throughout his life, that he had a special way with words and empathy. The gift of writing culminated in Napoleon penning 9 completed manuscripts, some of which are short stories and others are longer novel-length works. In addition, he has written and produced 3 dramatic plays of an historical bent. Unable to find a national publisher for other of his works, Napoleon self-published and distributed them throughout the Midwest, where they have been popular.
The driving force behind the first published manuscript, The Emancipation of Nate Bynum, was Napoleon’s desire to tell the unknown stories about the integral part that Blacks played in the American Civil War and the Wild West, and to right the wrongs of early historical writers who depicted Blacks, women, and other minorities as inept, weak-minded, and inferior to their white counterparts.
Napoleon poured his experience as a cowboy, rodeo team roper, private investigator, martial artist, bodyguard, and trial lawyer into the building of his characters. He used family legends and oral and written history to form his plots. When he describes the way a horse moves, a steer bolts, or a punch is thrown, he’s rode the move, headed off the bolt, and threw the punch. His experience as a practicing trial lawyer is used to craft the many legal and ethical dilemmas in which his characters find themselves.
Napoleon resides with his wife and family in Lawrence, Kansas, the seed-bed in which the buddings of the American Civil War were sewn. He still practices law 50 to 60 hours per week, and many of his nights are reserved for writing and polishing his manuscripts with a view for future publication.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Fireside Novels
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Published on
May 31, 2004
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Pages
36
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / African American / Historical
Fiction / Coming of Age
Fiction / Historical
Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Historical
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Napoleon Crews
On June 2, 1882 at about 9:30 p.m., David Bausman met death at the Kaw River while engaging in sexual intercourse with 14 year-old Sis Vinegar.  Bausman was set upon by George Robinson, Sis’ boyfriend, and his friend Isaac King.  On June 10, 1882 at about 1:00 a.m., a mob broke into the Douglas County Jail, removed Robinson, King, and Pete Vinegar, Sis’ father, and dragged them to the Kaw River Bridge and lynched them, one by one.  Sis was spared the rope.

The coroner’s inquest determined that Bausman, an upstanding, well-to-do, white citizen of Lawrence and former soldier in the Civil War, was lured to the Kaw River bottoms by Sis Vinegar, a Negro prostitute.  Bausman was robbed, beaten to death, and his battered body thrown into the water by the ‘Vinegar bunch.’  News articles described the Vinegar family as a den of outcasts, beggars, and thieves.  Lawrence attorneys refused to represent Sis.  She pled guilty and was sentenced to a life in prison at the federal prison in Leavenworth, Kansas.  Sis died of tuberculosis, contracted from another inmate, seven years into her sentence.

Margaret ‘Sis’ Vinegar has never told her story, until now that is.  Even a casual consideration of the facts and evidence points to a monumental miscarriage of justice, and three important questions arise.  Was Bausman truly the upstanding citizen he was portrayed to be?  Did Sis Vinegar and her family rightfully earn the labels of beggars and thieves?  Why was it crucial to the Free State Cause that the Vinegars’ due process rights be severed and the lynch mob interposed as the best resolution for the Lawrence Community and the State of Kansas?

Sis Vinegar’s Story is told through Attorney John Waller, who actually sought a governor’s pardon for Sis.  John Waller is aided by his wife Susan, an articulate and forceful woman.  The Wallers are joined by Lawrence, Kansas’ only Negro police officer, who was actually on the force at the time of the lynching.  Sam’s reputation included excellent investigative skills.

Napoleon Crews
On June 2, 1882 at about 9:30 p.m., David Bausman met death at the Kaw River while engaging in sexual intercourse with 14 year-old Sis Vinegar.  Bausman was set upon by George Robinson, Sis’ boyfriend, and his friend Isaac King.  On June 10, 1882 at about 1:00 a.m., a mob broke into the Douglas County Jail, removed Robinson, King, and Pete Vinegar, Sis’ father, and dragged them to the Kaw River Bridge and lynched them, one by one.  Sis was spared the rope.

The coroner’s inquest determined that Bausman, an upstanding, well-to-do, white citizen of Lawrence and former soldier in the Civil War, was lured to the Kaw River bottoms by Sis Vinegar, a Negro prostitute.  Bausman was robbed, beaten to death, and his battered body thrown into the water by the ‘Vinegar bunch.’  News articles described the Vinegar family as a den of outcasts, beggars, and thieves.  Lawrence attorneys refused to represent Sis.  She pled guilty and was sentenced to a life in prison at the federal prison in Leavenworth, Kansas.  Sis died of tuberculosis, contracted from another inmate, seven years into her sentence.

Margaret ‘Sis’ Vinegar has never told her story, until now that is.  Even a casual consideration of the facts and evidence points to a monumental miscarriage of justice, and three important questions arise.  Was Bausman truly the upstanding citizen he was portrayed to be?  Did Sis Vinegar and her family rightfully earn the labels of beggars and thieves?  Why was it crucial to the Free State Cause that the Vinegars’ due process rights be severed and the lynch mob interposed as the best resolution for the Lawrence Community and the State of Kansas?

Sis Vinegar’s Story is told through Attorney John Waller, who actually sought a governor’s pardon for Sis.  John Waller is aided by his wife Susan, an articulate and forceful woman.  The Wallers are joined by Lawrence, Kansas’ only Negro police officer, who was actually on the force at the time of the lynching.  Sam’s reputation included excellent investigative skills.

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