Lost Crops of Africa

Lost Crops of Africa

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This report is the second in a series of three evaluating underexploited African plant resources that could help broaden and secure Africa's food supply. The volume describes the characteristics of 18 little-known indigenous African vegetables (including tubers and legumes) that have potential as food- and cash-crops but are typically overlooked by scientists and policymakers and in the world at large. The book assesses the potential of each vegetable to help overcome malnutrition, boost food security, foster rural development, and create sustainable landcare in Africa. Each species is described in a separate chapter, based on information gathered from and verified by a pool of experts throughout the world. Volume I describes African grains and Volume III African fruits.
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Additional Information

Publisher
National Academies Press
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Published on
Oct 27, 2006
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Pages
378
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ISBN
9780309164542
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Biology
Science / Life Sciences / General
Technology & Engineering / Agriculture / Agronomy / Crop Science
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Scenes of starvation have drawn the world's attention to Africa's agricultural and environmental crisis. Some observers question whether this continent can ever hope to feed its growing population. Yet there is an overlooked food resource in sub-Saharan Africa that has vast potential: native food plants.
When experts were asked to nominate African food plants for inclusion in a new book, a list of 30 species grew quickly to hundreds. All in all, Africa has more than 2,000 native grains and fruits--"lost" species due for rediscovery and exploitation.
This volume focuses on native cereals, including
African rice, reserved until recently as a luxury food for religious rituals. Finger millet, neglected internationally although it is a staple for millions. Fonio (acha), probably the oldest African cereal and sometimes called "hungry rice." Pearl millet, a widely used grain that still holds great untapped potential. Sorghum, with prospects for making the twenty-first century the "century of sorghum." Tef, in many ways ideal but only now enjoying budding commercial production. Other cultivated and wild grains.
This readable and engaging book dispels myths, often based on Western bias, about the nutritional value, flavor, and yield of these African grains.
Designed as a tool for economic development, the volume is organized with increasing levels of detail to meet the needs of both lay and professional readers. The authors present the available information on where and how each grain is grown, harvested, and processed, and they list its benefits and limitations as a food source.
The authors describe "next steps" for increasing the use of each grain, outline research needs, and address issues in building commercial production.
Sidebars cover such interesting points as the potential use of gene mapping and other "high-tech" agricultural techniques on these grains.
This fact-filled volume will be of great interest to agricultural experts, entrepreneurs, researchers, and individuals concerned about restoring food production, environmental health, and economic opportunity in sub-Saharan Africa.
Selection, Newbridge Garden Book Club
Scenes of starvation have drawn the world's attention to Africa's agricultural and environmental crisis. Some observers question whether this continent can ever hope to feed its growing population. Yet there is an overlooked food resource in sub-Saharan Africa that has vast potential: native food plants.
When experts were asked to nominate African food plants for inclusion in a new book, a list of 30 species grew quickly to hundreds. All in all, Africa has more than 2,000 native grains and fruits--"lost" species due for rediscovery and exploitation.
This volume focuses on native cereals, including
African rice, reserved until recently as a luxury food for religious rituals. Finger millet, neglected internationally although it is a staple for millions. Fonio (acha), probably the oldest African cereal and sometimes called "hungry rice." Pearl millet, a widely used grain that still holds great untapped potential. Sorghum, with prospects for making the twenty-first century the "century of sorghum." Tef, in many ways ideal but only now enjoying budding commercial production. Other cultivated and wild grains.

This readable and engaging book dispels myths, often based on Western bias, about the nutritional value, flavor, and yield of these African grains.
Designed as a tool for economic development, the volume is organized with increasing levels of detail to meet the needs of both lay and professional readers. The authors present the available information on where and how each grain is grown, harvested, and processed, and they list its benefits and limitations as a food source.
The authors describe "next steps" for increasing the use of each grain, outline research needs, and address issues in building commercial production.
Sidebars cover such interesting points as the potential use of gene mapping and other "high-tech" agricultural techniques on these grains.
This fact-filled volume will be of great interest to agricultural experts, entrepreneurs, researchers, and individuals concerned about restoring food production, environmental health, and economic opportunity in sub-Saharan Africa.
Selection, Newbridge Garden Book Club

World-wide losses of crops, post-harvest, through microbial action, pests, diseases and other types of spoilage amount to millions of tons every year. This essential handbook is the first in a three-volume series which covers all factors affecting post-harvest quality of all major fruits, vegetables, cereals and other crops. Compiled by members of the world-renowned Natural Resources Institute at the University of Greenwich, Chatham, UK, the comprehensive contents of this landmark publication encourage interactions between each sector of the agricultural community in order to improve food security, food safety and food quality in today’s global atmosphere.

Through the carefully compiled and edited chapters, internationally respected authors discuss ways to improve harvest yield and quality, drawing on their many years’ practical experience and the latest research findings, applications and methodologies. Subjects covered include: an introduction to the systems used in post-harvest agricultural processes, physical and biological factors affecting post-harvest commodities, storage issues, pest management, food processing and preservation, food systems, the latest research and assimilation of this work, and current trade and international agreements. An invaluable glossary showing important pests, pathogens and plants is also included.

Crop Post-Harvest: Science and Technology Volume 1: Principles and Practice is a must-have reference book which offers the reader an overview of the globalisation of post-harvest science, technology, economics, and the development of the storage and handling of perishable and durable products. Volumes 2 and 3 will go on to explore durables and perishables individually in more detail, with many case studies taken from around the globe.

This 3-volume work is the standard handbook and reference for all professionals involved in the harvesting, shipping, storage and processing of crops, including agricultural and plant scientists, food scientists and technologists, microbiologists, plant pathologists, entomologists and all post harvest, shipping and storage consultants. Libraries in all universities and research establishments where these subjects are studied and taught should have multiple copies on their shelves.

Completely revised, updated and enlarged, now encompassing two volumes, this third edition of Fruit and Vegetables reviews and evaluates, in comprehensive detail, postharvest aspects of a very wide international range of fresh fruit and vegetables as it applies to their physiology, quality, technology, harvest maturity determination, harvesting methods, packaging, postharvest treatments, controlled atmosphere storage, ripening and transportation.

The new edition of this definitive work, which contains many full colour photographs, and details of species not covered in the previous editions, provides key practical and commercially-oriented information of great use in helping to ensure that fresh fruit and vegetables reach the retailer in optimum condition, with the minimum of deterioration and spoilage.

With the constantly increasing experimental work throughout the world the book incorporates salient advances in the context of current work, as well as that dating back over a century, to give options to the reader to choose what is most relevant to their situation and needs. This is important because recommendations in the literature are often conflicting; part of the evaluation of the published results and reviews is to guide the reader to make suitable choices through discussion of the reasons for diverse recommendations. Also included is much more on the nutritional values of fruit and vegetables, and how these may vary and change postharvest. There is also additional information on the origin, domestication and taxonomy of fruit and vegetables, putting recommendations in context.

Fruits and Vegetables 3e is essential reading for fruit and vegetable technologists, food scientists and food technologists, agricultural scientists, commercial growers, shippers, packhouse operatives and personnel within packaging companies. Researchers and upper level students in food science, food technology, plant and agricultural sciences will find a great deal of use within this popular book. All libraries in research establishments and universities where these subjects are studied and taught should have copies readily available for users.

The "homeland" security mission of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is paradoxical: Its mission space is uniquely focused on the domestic consequences of security threats, but these threats may be international in origin, organization, and implementation. The DHS is responsible for the domestic security implications of threats to the United States posed, in part, through the global networks of which the United States is a part. While the security of the U.S. air transportation network could be increased if it were isolated from connections to the larger international network, doing so would be a highly destructive step for the entire fabric of global commerce and the free movement of people.


Instead, the U.S. government, led by DHS, is taking a leadership role in the process of protecting the global networks in which the United States participates. These numerous networks are both real (e.g., civil air transport, international ocean shipping, postal services, international air freight) and virtual (the Internet, international financial payments system), and they have become vital elements of the U.S. economy and civil society.


Export Control Challenges Associated with Securing the Homeland found that outdated regulations are not uniquely responsible for the problems that export controls post to DHS, although they are certainly an integral part of the picture. This report also explains that the source of these problems lies within a policy process that has yet to take into account the unique mission of DHS relative to export controls. Export Control Challenges Associated with Securing the Homeland explains the need by the Department of Defense and State to recognize the international nature of DHS's vital statutory mission, the need to further develop internal processes at DHS to meet export control requirements and implement export control policies, as well as the need to reform the export control interagency process in ways that enable DHS to work through the U.S. export control process to cooperate with its foreign counterparts.

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