Firearms Law and the Second Amendment: Regulation, Rights, and Policy, Edition 2

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This casebook is the first and only traditional law school casebook to cover the subject. It provides a comprehensive treatment of cases and materials before and after the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark cases in District of Columbia v. Heller (2008) and McDonald v. Chicago (2010), which affirmed the constitutional right to private firearm possession and use, and made the right enforceable against the states. From days of Anglo-Saxon King Alfred’s militia in the eighth century through the latest cases on electric stun guns and 3-D printed firearms, this casebook covers all aspects of firearms law, policy, and regulation. Rather than looking at arms laws in isolation, the book pays careful attention to changing contexts in race, class, religion, technology, and politics. It is ideally suited to law school courses on firearms law, the Second Amendment, criminal law, jurisprudence and legal history.

Key Benefits:

  • Comprehensive coverage of all aspects of firearms law, from early English origins to present-day debates.
  • Ideally suited for a dedicated law school course in firearms law and the Second Amendment.
  • Supplemental materials on the website will provide a continuing research resource, tracking the most current developments in firearms law, regulation, and policy.
  • Five online chapters on firearms and status, the philosophy of citizen arms bearing, international law, comparative law, and an in-depth explanation of firearm and ammunition functionality.
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About the author

Nicholas J. Johnson is the author of Chasing the Ace which made the Ned Kelly 2015 shortlists in the category of Best First Novel.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
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Published on
Oct 5, 2017
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Pages
1416
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ISBN
9781454892663
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Constitutional
Law / Legal Education
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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With dynamic learning features and visual aids, the Inside Series helps you make the most of your study time, throughout the semester and as you prepare for the final. Unlike heavily abridged treatises, the Inside Series is carefully written in a concise, straightforward style that clearly identifies the essential components of the law and how they fit together. You can quickly learn what is important and why. Overviews and Tables of Contents in each chapter act as a roadmap to guide you through topics, showing you how each relates to the larger legal framework. FAQs clarify points of law and help you avoid common mistakes and misconceptions. Sidebars give fascinating additional detail from legal history, policy, famous cases and more. The graphic design supports your visual learning, and features such as bolded key terms, summaries, and Connections help reinforce your understanding while giving you ample opportunity for self-review.

Surprisingly concise, visually compelling, the Inside Series is extremely useful throughout the semester to help you identify the essential components of the law and how they fit together.

Comprehensive coverage of the essential topics emphasizes what you need to know and why. Clear, straightforward, informal writing explains every topic for you without over-simplifying the concepts. Overviews and Tables of Contents in each chapter act as a roadmap to guide you through topics, showing you why each matters and how it fits into the larger framework of the law. FAQs clarify points of law and help you avoid common mistakes and misconceptions. Sidebars enrich the text with fascinating detail from legal history, policy, famous cases and more. Bolded key terms, Connections and summaries reinforce your understanding and give you ample opportunity for self-review. The overall graphical design of the series supports your visual learning.
An in-depth look at the defining document of America

Want to make sense of the U.S. Constitution? This plain-English guide walks you through this revered document, explaining how the articles and amendments came to be and how they have guided legislators, judges, and presidents and sparked ongoing debates. You'll understand all the big issues — from separation of church and state to impeachment to civil rights — that continue to affect Americans' daily lives.

Get started with Constitution basics — explore the main concepts and their origins, the different approaches to interpretation, and how the document has changed over the past 200+ years

Know who has the power — see how the public, the President, Congress, and the Supreme Court share in the ruling of America

Balance the branches of government — discover what it means to be Commander in Chief, the functions of the House and Senate, and how Supreme Court justices are appointed

Break down the Bill of Rights — from freedom of religion to the prohibition of "cruel and unusual punishments," understand what the first ten amendments mean

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Open the book and find:

The text of the Constitution and its ammendments

Discussion of controversial issues including the death penalty, abortion, and gay marriage

Why the word "democracy" doesn't appear in the Constitution

What the Electoral College is and how it elects a President

Details on recent Supreme Court decisions

The Founding Fathers' intentions for balancing power in Washington

Professors Fischl and Paul explain law school exams in ways no one
has before, all with an eye toward improving the reader’s performance.
The book begins by describing the difference between educational
cultures that praise students for “right answers,” and the law school
culture that rewards nuanced analysis of ambiguous situations in which
more than one approach may be correct. Enormous care is devoted to
explaining precisely how and why legal analysis frequently produces such
perplexing situations.


But the authors don’t stop with mere description. Instead, Getting to Maybe
teaches how to excel on law school exams by showing the reader how
legal analysis can be brought to bear on examination problems. The book
contains hints on studying and preparation that go well beyond
conventional advice. The authors also illustrate how to argue both sides
of a legal issue without appearing wishy-washy or indecisive. Above
all, the book explains why exam questions may generate feelings of
uncertainty or doubt about correct legal outcomes and how the student
can turn these feelings to his or her advantage.


In sum, although the authors believe that no exam guide can
substitute for a firm grasp of substantive material, readers who devote
the necessary time to learning the law will find this book an invaluable
guide to translating learning into better exam performance.


“This book should revolutionize the ordeal of studying for
law school exams… Its clear, insightful, fun to read, and right on the
money.” — Duncan Kennedy, Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence, Harvard Law School  “Finally
a study aid that takes legal theory seriously… Students who master
these lessons will surely write better exams. More importantly, they
will also learn to be better lawyers.” — Steven L. Winter, Brooklyn Law School “If
you can't spot a 'fork in the law' or a 'fork in the facts' in an exam
hypothetical, get this book. If you don’t know how to play 'Czar of the
Universe' on law school exams (or why), get this book. And if you do
want to learn how to think like a lawyer—a good one—get this book. It's,
quite simply, stone cold brilliant.” — Pierre Schlag, University of Colorado School of Law (Law Preview Book Review on The Princeton Review website)

Attend a Getting to Maybe seminar! Click here for more information.

Even in the 18th century, scholars realized it was not possible to know everything worth knowing; sometimes, we have to look it up. Fortunately for Dr. Johnson, he did not have to be familiar with so many sources and so many different techniques for finding information. He did, however, recognize the value of knowing where to find information. What today's Internet-enabled workers have discovered is that we also need to know how to search and how to evaluate what we find. Real World Research Skills, Second Edition, compiles basic advice, techniques, reference information, and resources to help working professionals find accurate information quickly. It is written particularly for those whose work involves tapping into federal government information. The book began as a set of materials for TheCapitol.Net's seminar, "Research Tools and Techniques: Refining Your Online and Offline Searches." It is designed to be used as a complement to that seminar or independently as a desk reference. The first and second chapters cover practical principles of research and online searching, including the general search engines. These sections include checklists and advice that are applicable to many different research tasks and many different databases and search engines. The third, fourth, and fifth chapters present resources for federal legislative, judicial, and executive branch research. The sixth chapter covers starting points for state and international research on the web. The final chapter, "Experts and Insiders," has tips for tapping into that vital Washington information resource: people. In our knowledge economy, more and more people-with a wide range of education and experience-are moving into jobs that require some information-gathering skills. The research training provided at many schools lays a foundation, but often does not prepare us for the varied demands of the working world. This book can help anyone involved in government research by increasing their information literacy, improving their research effectiveness and efficiency. Each chapter has a chapter summary and review questions, making it easy to use in the classroom. Summary Table of Contents - Introduction - Chapter 1 Before You Start Your Research - Chapter 2 Going Beyond Google - Chapter 3 Legislative Branch Research - Chapter 4 Judicial Branch Research - Chapter 5 Executive Branch Research - Chapter 6 State and International Research - Chapter 7 Experts and Insiders - Table of Web Sites - Index For a complete Table of Contents, see RealWorldResearchSkills.com
One L, Scott Turow's journal of his first year at law school introduces and a best-seller when it was first published in 1977, has gone on to become a virtual bible for prospective law students. Not only does it introduce with remarkable clarity the ideas and issues that are the stuff of legal education; it brings alive the anxiety and competiveness--with others and, even more, with oneself--that set the tone in this crucible of character building. Turow's multidimensional delving into his protagonists' psyches and his marvelous gift for suspense prefigure the achievements of his celebrated first novel, Presumed Innocent, one of the best-selling and most talked about books of 1987.

Each September, a new crop of students enter Harvard Law School to begin an intense, often grueling, sometimes harrowing year of introduction to the law. Turow's group of One Ls are fresh, bright, ambitious, and more than a little daunting. Even more impressive are the faculty: Perini, the dazzling, combative professor of contracts, who presents himself as the students' antagonist in their struggle to master his subject; Zechman, the reserved professor of torts who seems so indecisive the students fear he cannot teach; and Nicky Morris, a young, appealing man who stressed the humanistic aspects of law.

Will the One Ls survive? Will they excel? Will they make the Law Review, the outward and visible sign of success in this ultra-conservative microcosm? With remarkable insight into both his fellows and himself, Turow leads us through the ups and downs, the small triumphs and tragedies of the year, in an absorbing and throught-provoking narrative that teaches the reader not only about law school and the law but about the human beings who make them what they are.

In the new afterword for this edition of One L, the author looks back on law school from the perspective of ten years' work as a lawyer and offers some suggestions for reforming legal education.

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