Class Dismissed: Why College Isn't the Answer

Post Hill Press
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You’re just about to graduate high school. Your parents, your friends, your teachers, and society all tell you that the next step is college, that without higher education, you won’t be able to get a quality job, you’ll struggle to pay your bills, and you’ll fail.

They’re wrong.

 

Sure, for many, college can be the perfect launching pad. The societal aspect of school can be transformative, and the exposure to different people, different thoughts, and different ideas is crucial.

 

But for millions of young Americans, college is not the answer. What about the teenager for whom sitting in a classroom is unfulfilling and frustrating? What about the kid with a skillset that can’t be nurtured on campus?

 

In Class Dismissed: Why College Isn’t the Answer, Nick Adams explains how you can achieve the American Dream without receiving a traditional education. An essential tool for parents and grandparents, this book discusses how families can recognize whether their child will get more from a trade school or a mentorship than they will from four years of study.

 

In a warm, engaging, and often humorous fashion, Adams will inspire individuals who want to march into their professional life with a sense of empowerment that can only be attained by recognizing and doing what’s right for you.

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About the author

Nick Adams is a motivational speaker, business innovator and life coach. The best-selling author runs the Foundation for Liberty and American Greatness (FLAG), an organization that teaches civics and informs parents and students on the power of the American Dream.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Post Hill Press
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Published on
Jan 29, 2019
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Pages
130
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ISBN
9781642930689
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Higher
Family & Relationships / General
Self-Help / Personal Growth / Success
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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"Hands Up, If You're Single!" was born out of a need to introduce new, uplifting, and inspirational reading material into the lives of men and women who are single, separated, divorced, widowed, or live as single parents. Frustrated with media content that portrays single people as lonely or preoccupied with searching for a mate, Bernadette Meyers could no longer ingest these unflattering descriptions without feeling some form of nausea. With a growing need to right a wrong, Meyers decided it was time to swing the pendulum, of single living, in a positive direction and set out to write a book of her own. Each chapter is imaginatively presented. Some chapters discuss lifestyles, friends, family, work and money while others discuss highlighting your inner balance, your creativity, doing your personal best and your sexuality. It looks at living with purpose, maintaining personal power and dealing with adversity. Page after page, Bernadette Meyers supports single men and women who love their lifestyles, live their dreams to the fullest, and who love themselves for who they are. Filled with practical, yet appealing advice, this book is also intended to transform a cynical attitude about single living into an opportunity for personal growth. Cleverly illustrated, in "Hands Up, If You’re Single!" are written accounts by men and women, from around the world. These contributors share some of the 'best and worst times' they experienced as single people, along with some amazing stories of personal development and individual accomplishments. Meyers writing style is witty, humorous and easy to read. Her book reflects an energetic, electrifying attitude towards living as a single person and dispels the myth that singles live an 'under the stairs' kind of existence.
#1 New York Times Bestseller

Over 1 million copies sold

In this generation-defining self-help guide, a superstar blogger cuts through the crap to show us how to stop trying to be "positive" all the time so that we can truly become better, happier people.

For decades, we’ve been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F**k positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let’s be honest, shit is f**ked and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn’t sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is—a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is his antidote to the coddling, let’s-all-feel-good mindset that has infected American society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

Manson makes the argument, backed both by academic research and well-timed poop jokes, that improving our lives hinges not on our ability to turn lemons into lemonade, but on learning to stomach lemons better. Human beings are flawed and limited—"not everybody can be extraordinary, there are winners and losers in society, and some of it is not fair or your fault." Manson advises us to get to know our limitations and accept them. Once we embrace our fears, faults, and uncertainties, once we stop running and avoiding and start confronting painful truths, we can begin to find the courage, perseverance, honesty, responsibility, curiosity, and forgiveness we seek.

There are only so many things we can give a f**k about so we need to figure out which ones really matter, Manson makes clear. While money is nice, caring about what you do with your life is better, because true wealth is about experience. A much-needed grab-you-by-the-shoulders-and-look-you-in-the-eye moment of real-talk, filled with entertaining stories and profane, ruthless humor, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is a refreshing slap for a generation to help them lead contented, grounded lives.

White people of America, we know you've got it rough.

Sure, black men and women have been through four hundred years of slavery, oppression, murder, and watching white college students try to dance. But now that it's hip to have black friends, white people aren't sure how to go about it. And that is a real American tragedy. Thank God Nick Adams is here to help you avoid potential racial pitfalls and successfully make the transition from white to "aiight." Now, you'll know not to start a conversation with, "So, that new Jay-Z album is pretty great, right?" Or tell a co-worker he looks just like (fill in blank with name of dark-skinned person who works in the other building.) You'll know that a lot of black people you meet at parties or work functions don't care who played Thelma's husband on "Good Times", don't want to discuss the Malcolm X biography you just read and definitely don't want to listen to country music. Ever. Yes, it's a good thing Nick is here to explain. Because if we're going to live together in peace and harmony, you people are going to need help.

Black People, Briefly Explained. A Q&A with Nick Adams

Q: Nick, what is the correct term to use when addressing my new friends: Black or African-American?
A: Personally, I always liked Afro-American. I liked being named after a 1970's hairdo. But then I wondered why we didn't become the Jheri-curled Americans or High Top Fade Americans.

Q: Nick, if black people can use the "N" word as a term of endearment, can I, a white person, do so?
A: No. I don't care if you have your hair in cornrows while wearing a Phat Farm t-shirt at an R. Kelly concert. Black people don't get to be president, and white people don't get to use the word nigger. Can we just call it even now?

Q: Nick, I'd like to try slang. Is that okay?
A: When you guys start using our words, that's when we know it's time for us to stop using them. Every time a white, middle-aged math teacher calls a student, "dog," black people all over the country are notified via email. Believe it.

Q: Nick, surely you have to agree that Eminem is a hip-hop visionary?
A: Let's try this one more time: Kurtis Blow, RUN-DMC, LL Cool J, Rakim, Chuck D, KRS-One, Tupac, Notorious B.I.G., Nas, Common, Mos Def, Bitch!
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