Retaking America: Crushing Political Correctness

Post Hill Press
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Political correctness has ripped through America, turning life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness into lifelessness, suppression and the pursuit of mediocrity. Meanwhile, Europe is in its death throes, completely infected by the political correctness disease.

Australian Nick Adams believes only America has the cure. But the race is on. Will America be able to save itself in time, and lead a stunning turnaround–or will it succumb to a European fate?

With creativity, flair and his trademark wit, Australian Nick Adams deftly exposes why political correctness is behind every problem in America today, and why it is every American’s patriotic duty to defy politically correct mandates. He explains Americans face a momentous choice in this election year, and lays out a roadmap for an American renaissance.
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About the author

Nick Adams is a bestselling Australian author, columnist and commentator in America.

 Adams has appeared on virtually every major television and radio program. He is a columnist for Townhall Finance and also serves as a Centennial Institute Policy Fellow at Colorado Christian University. His work has been published in newspapers around the world.

He has spoken at conventions, corporate meetings, military bases, universities, high schools and churches in over 25 states. He is a survivor of childhood cancer, given at the age of sixteen months just a five percent chance of survival.

Adams earned both undergraduate and postgraduate degrees at the University of Sydney. He was publicly elected the youngest Deputy Mayor in Australian history in Sydney, at the age of twenty-one and in 2013 Governor Rick Perry appointed him an Honorary Texan.

Visit nickadamsinamerica.com.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Post Hill Press
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Published on
Feb 23, 2016
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781618688514
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Political
Political Science / Commentary & Opinion
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Conservatism & Liberalism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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A former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State and currently Acting Senior Vice President for Research at The Heritage Foundation, Kim R. Holmes surveys the state of liberalism in America today and finds that it is becoming its opposite—illiberalism—abandoning the precepts of open-mindedness and respect for individual rights, liberties, and the rule of law upon which the country was founded, and becoming instead an intolerant, rigidly dogmatic ideology that abhors dissent and stifles free speech. Tracing the new illiberalism historically to the radical Enlightenment, a movement that rejected the classic liberal ideas of the moderate Enlightenment that were prominent in the American Founding, Holmes argues that today’s liberalism has forsaken its American roots, incorporating instead the authoritarian, anti-clerical, and anti-capitalist prejudices of the radical and largely European Left. The result is a closing of the American liberal mind. Where once freedom of speech and expression were sacrosanct, today liberalism employs speech codes, trigger warnings, boycotts, and shaming rituals to stifle freedom of thought, expression, and action. It is no longer appropriate to call it liberalism at all, but illiberalism—a set of ideas in politics, government, and popular culture that increasingly reflects authoritarian and even anti-democratic values, and which is devising new strategies of exclusiveness to eliminate certain ideas and people from the political process. Although illiberalism has always been a temptation for American liberals, lurking in the radical fringes of the Left, it is today the dominant ideology of progressive liberal circles. This makes it a new danger not only to the once venerable tradition of liberalism, but to the American nation itself, which needs a viable liberal tradition that pursues social and economic equality while respecting individual liberties.
Stop thinking about who you might offend and start thinking about who you might inspire.

Fans are always asking Tomi Lahren where she gained the confidence and candor that have made her who she is: a celebrated free-speech advocate, a conservative media star, and one of the most controversial pundits in America.

In Never Play Dead, Tomi cheers on anyone, especially other young women willing to speak their minds. She takes readers on a tour of the internet trolls, political correctness police, campus activists, and condescending elites who never pass up a chance to quash honest debate. And she skewers the self-esteem movement that ironically discourages people from speaking up for themselves.

She tells the story of how she worked her way out of South Dakota to television fame in LA, surviving social isolation, a truly terrible boyfriend, and awful workplaces. Along the way, she was tempted to follow everyone’s advice to keep quiet and bide her time, but she never did.

This comes at a cost. Any time Tomi posts a video or sends out a tweet, it makes headlines. A video of a stranger throwing a glass of ice water at her and her parents went viral, and the president tweeted about it. She was fired at The Blaze because she wouldn’t toe the party line. However, it’s fine to lose followers as long as you never lose yourself. Whether you’ve been told you’re not good enough by parents, lovers, frenemies, bad bosses, or social media, it’s time to take Lahren’s advice and fight back.

Free speech isn’t just saying what you want; it’s hearing what you don’t want to hear. Never Play Dead teaches you to shed your fear, find your inner strength, speak the truth, and never let the haters get you down.

 

“You can’t say that. You’re fired.”
 
Prize-winning Washington journalist Juan Williams was unceremoniously dismissed by NPR for speaking his mind and saying what many Americans feel—that he gets nervous when boarding airplanes with passengers dressed in Muslim garb. NPR banished the veteran journalist in an act of political correctness that ultimately sparked nationwide outrage and led to calls for Congress to end its public funding of the media organization.
 
In Muzzled, Williams uses his very public firing as a launching pad to discuss the countless ways in which honest debate in America—from the halls of Congress and the health care town halls to the talk shows and print media—is stifled. In today’s partisan world, where media provocateurs rule the airwaves and political correctness dictates what can and cannot be said with impunity, Williams shows how the honest exchange of ideas and the search for solutions and reasonable compromise is deliberately muzzled. Only those toeing the party’s line—the screaming voices of the extremist—get airtime and dominate the discussion in politics and the media. Each side, liberal and conservative, preaches to a choir that revels in expressions of anger, ideology, conspiracies, and demonized opponents. The result is an absence of truth-telling and honest debate about the facts. Among the issues denied a full-throated discussion are racial profiling; the increased reliance on religious beliefs in debating American values and legislation; the nuances of an immigration policym gone awry; why abortion is promoted as a hot button wedge issue to incite the pary faithful and drive donations; the uneasy balance between individual freedom and our desire for security of against terrorism; and much more.
 
A fierce, fresh look at the critical importance of an open airing of controversial issues, Muzzled is a hard hitting critique of the topics and concerns we can’t talk about without suffering retaliation at the hands of the politically correct police. Only by bringing such hot button issues into the light of day can we hope to grapple with them, and exercise our cherished, hard-won right of free speech.
New York Times best-selling authors Dick Morris and Eileen McGann, in their upcoming release by Humanix Books, contend that President Obama is at war with the Constitution and its provisions that provide for
checks and balances.

President Obama s style of leadership is proof that he is willing to use desperate measures. In Power Grab, Morris and McGann assert that Obama has embarked on an outrageous and sweeping scheme to decisively and illegally grab power away from Congress, the Courts, and the States to appropriate it to himself.

Ultimately, under the guise of practicality, the President of the United States has become utterly intolerant and unquestionably dictatorial. He rules on his own by executive fiat and few, if any, in Congress protest.

A former presidential advisor to Bill Clinton, Dick Morris argues that Obama has gone well beyond any previous president in extending executive power. He has defied the will of our forefathers, stepped over states rights, and systematically brushed aside explicit laws with little outrage from other branches of government.

In Power Grab, Morris and McGann say that Obama has grown even more bold in his acquisition of power after seeing so little opposition. And he has no plans to stop anytime soon, as the authors flawlessly illustrate in their in-depth analysis of his increasingly brazen behavior.

Morris and McGann lay out a plan to stop Obama s abuse of power. They say President Obama s critics, and even those who sympathize with his political views but share a deep respect for the Constitution, can join together to stop the most significant, overreaching executive power ever.

Power Grab is sure to leave the reader without any doubt as to just how pervasive his usurpation of Congressional power has become.
White people of America, we know you've got it rough.

Sure, black men and women have been through four hundred years of slavery, oppression, murder, and watching white college students try to dance. But now that it's hip to have black friends, white people aren't sure how to go about it. And that is a real American tragedy. Thank God Nick Adams is here to help you avoid potential racial pitfalls and successfully make the transition from white to "aiight." Now, you'll know not to start a conversation with, "So, that new Jay-Z album is pretty great, right?" Or tell a co-worker he looks just like (fill in blank with name of dark-skinned person who works in the other building.) You'll know that a lot of black people you meet at parties or work functions don't care who played Thelma's husband on "Good Times", don't want to discuss the Malcolm X biography you just read and definitely don't want to listen to country music. Ever. Yes, it's a good thing Nick is here to explain. Because if we're going to live together in peace and harmony, you people are going to need help.

Black People, Briefly Explained. A Q&A with Nick Adams

Q: Nick, what is the correct term to use when addressing my new friends: Black or African-American?
A: Personally, I always liked Afro-American. I liked being named after a 1970's hairdo. But then I wondered why we didn't become the Jheri-curled Americans or High Top Fade Americans.

Q: Nick, if black people can use the "N" word as a term of endearment, can I, a white person, do so?
A: No. I don't care if you have your hair in cornrows while wearing a Phat Farm t-shirt at an R. Kelly concert. Black people don't get to be president, and white people don't get to use the word nigger. Can we just call it even now?

Q: Nick, I'd like to try slang. Is that okay?
A: When you guys start using our words, that's when we know it's time for us to stop using them. Every time a white, middle-aged math teacher calls a student, "dog," black people all over the country are notified via email. Believe it.

Q: Nick, surely you have to agree that Eminem is a hip-hop visionary?
A: Let's try this one more time: Kurtis Blow, RUN-DMC, LL Cool J, Rakim, Chuck D, KRS-One, Tupac, Notorious B.I.G., Nas, Common, Mos Def, Bitch!
From 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, a captivating account of how "a skinny Asian kid from upstate" became a successful entrepreneur, only to find a new mission: calling attention to the urgent steps America must take, including Universal Basic Income, to stabilize our economy amid rapid technological change and automation.

The shift toward automation is about to create a tsunami of unemployment. Not in the distant future--now. One recent estimate predicts 45 million American workers will lose their jobs within the next twelve years--jobs that won't be replaced. In a future marked by restlessness and chronic unemployment, what will happen to American society?

In The War on Normal People, Andrew Yang paints a dire portrait of the American economy. Rapidly advancing technologies like artificial intelligence, robotics and automation software are making millions of Americans' livelihoods irrelevant. The consequences of these trends are already being felt across our communities in the form of political unrest, drug use, and other social ills. The future looks dire-but is it unavoidable?

In The War on Normal People, Yang imagines a different future--one in which having a job is distinct from the capacity to prosper and seek fulfillment. At this vision's core is Universal Basic Income, the concept of providing all citizens with a guaranteed income-and one that is rapidly gaining popularity among forward-thinking politicians and economists. Yang proposes that UBI is an essential step toward a new, more durable kind of economy, one he calls "human capitalism."
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