Hitler, Ribbentrop and Britain: The Breaking of Versailles Part One

Andrews UK Limited
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A fraudulent chancer, fantasist and con artist, Joachim Von Ribbentrop charmed Hitler and dominates the Fuhrer's inner circle for much of the 1930s. Hitler was totally taken in by the version of the world Ribbentrop presented to him, so much so that he became the Nazi leader's unofficial, then official ambassador, causing discord and diplomatic havoc wherever he went.This edition of Explaining History focuses on Hitler's first attempts to reshape the European order, by undermining the Treaty of Versailles, and attempting to build an alliance with Britain. It was an attempt doomed to failure, and fated to shape the nature of the coming war.
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About the author

Nick Shepley is an historian, writer and teacher who lives in Wales with his wife, a mountain of books and their cat Chomsky.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Andrews UK Limited
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Published on
Dec 7, 2015
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Pages
48
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ISBN
9781783331147
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Germany
History / Military / World War II
History / Modern / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Christopher R. Browning
Christopher R. Browning’s shocking account of how a unit of average middle-aged Germans became the cold-blooded murderers of tens of thousands of Jews—now with a new afterword and additional photographs.

Ordinary Men is the true story of Reserve Police Battalion 101 of the German Order Police, which was responsible for mass shootings as well as round-ups of Jewish people for deportation to Nazi death camps in Poland in 1942. Browning argues that most of the men of RPB 101 were not fanatical Nazis but, rather, ordinary middle-aged, working-class men who committed these atrocities out of a mixture of motives, including the group dynamics of conformity, deference to authority, role adaptation, and the altering of  moral norms to justify their actions. Very quickly three groups emerged within the battalion: a core of eager killers, a plurality who carried out their duties reliably but without initiative, and a small minority who evaded participation in the acts of killing without diminishing the murderous efficiency of the battalion whatsoever.

While this book discusses a specific Reserve Unit during WWII, the general argument Browning makes is that most people succumb to the pressures of a group setting and commit actions they would never do of their own volition.  

Ordinary Men is a powerful, chilling, and important work with themes and arguments that continue to resonate today.

“A remarkable—and singularly chilling—glimpse of human behavior...This meticulously researched book...represents a major contribution to the literature of the Holocaust."—Newsweek

 


 

Nick Shepley
Henry Green: Class, Style, and the Everyday offers a critical prism through which Green's fiction—from his earliest published short stories, as an Eton schoolboy, through to his last dialogic novels of the 1950s—can be seen as a coherent, subtle, and humorous critique of the tension between class, style, and realism in the first half of the twentieth century. The study extends on-going critical recognition that Green's work is central to the development of the novel from the twenties to the fifties, acting as a vital bridge between late modernist, inter-war, post-war, and postmodernist fiction. The overarching contention is that the shifting and destabilizing nature of Green's oeuvre sets up a predicament similar to that confronted by theorists of the everyday. Consequently, each chapter acknowledges the indeterminacy of the writing, whether it be: the non-singular functioning (or malfunctioning) of the name; the open-ended, purposefully ambiguous nature of its symbols; the shifting, cinematic nature of Green's prose style; the sensitive, but resolutely unsentimental depictions of the working-classes and the aristocracy in the inter-war period; the impact of war and its inconsistent irruptions into daily life; or the ways in which moments or events are rapidly subsumed back into the flux of the everyday, their impact left uncertain. Critics have, historically, offered up singular readings of Green's work, or focused on the poetic or recreative qualities of certain works, particularly those of the 1940s. Green's writing is, undoubtedly, poetic and extraordinary, but this book also pays attention to the clichéd, meta-textual, and uneventful aspects of his fiction.
Nick Shepley
Exam Board: AQA
Level: AS/A-level
Subject: History
First Teaching: September 2015
First Exam: June 2016

AQA approved

Enhance and expand your students' knowledge and understanding of their AQA breadth study through expert narrative, progressive skills development and bespoke essays from leading historians on key debates.

- Builds students' understanding of the events and issues of the period with authoritative, well-researched narrative that covers the specification content

- Introduces the key concepts of change, continuity, cause and consequence, encouraging students to make comparisons across time as they advance through the course

- Improves students' skills in tackling interpretation questions and essay writing by providing clear guidance and practice activities

- Boosts students' interpretative skills and interest in history through extended reading opportunities consisting of specially commissioned essays from practising historians on relevant debates

- Cements understanding of the broad issues underpinning the period with overviews of the key questions, end-of-chapter summaries and diagrams that double up as handy revision aids

Democracy, Empire and War: Britain 1851-1964

This title explores political and social reform 1851-1914, the impact of both World Wars, the creation of the Welfare State and the transformational social changes of the 1950s and 1960s. It considers breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in this period through examining key questions on themes such as democracy, ideology, economy, society, Britain's' position in the world and the impact of key individuals.

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