Shipwrecks: Disasters on the High Seas

Arcturus Publishing
6
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Ships have been overwhelmed by huge waves, consumed by fires, broken apart, sunk by storms and driven onto uncharted rocks. They have collided with icebergs or other ships, been sunk by enemy torpedoes or gunfire, or run aground on unlit coastlines at night. Boilers have exploded. Magazines have ignited. Cargoes have shifted with catastrophic consequences and submarines have submerged never to come up again. Shipwrecks selects the sinkings with the greatest loss of life, the most famous vessels, the richest treasure troves, the most archaeologically significant wreck sites and the most daring rescues. It tells the tales of the fate of the victims, the disastrous mistakes made by ships' captains and navigators, the impossible conditions faced at sea, the courage of those who survived and the audacious attempts to raise what now lies at the bottom of the sea.
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Nigel Cawthorne
Born Josef Dzhugashvili in Gori, Georgia in 1879, the young Stalin studied to become a priest whilst secretly reading the works of Karl Marx. Politics was to become his religion and between 1902 and 1913 he was arrested for revolutionary activities and exiled to Siberia eight times, escaping on seven occasions. Following the Revolution he employed a cocktail of charm and ruthless cunning to slither up the treacherous Communist Party hierarchy, often by taking posts that nobody wanted which enabled him to build up a power base virtually unnoticed, until, with perfect timing, he was in a position to take over the Party leadership from Lenin when he died in 1924. Surrounding himself with terrified yes-men and trusting absolutely nobody, he was dictator of the Soviet Union from the late 1920s until his death in 1953. In that time he defeated Hitler, out-maneuvered all his rivals and forged a mighty and vast empire of over 800 million people from a patchwork of poor countries which included Russia itself, working on his simple premise of "Death is the solution to all problems. No man - no problem." The human cost was enormous, but this never troubled his conscience. Peasants who resisted his policy of collectivisation were denounced as kulaks and either arrested and shot, exiled or worked to death in the Gulag, his ever-expanding network of concentration camps. Nobody, not even his friends, family or allies were safe. Yet despite all this, he was worshipped by millions as a great leader, although he had more blood on his hands than Hitler, Mao Zedong and Pol Pot put together.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Arcturus Publishing
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Published on
Jul 27, 2005
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Pages
300
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ISBN
9781848586093
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Great Britain
History / Military / Naval
Transportation / Ships & Shipbuilding / General
Transportation / Ships & Shipbuilding / Repair & Maintenance
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Nigel Cawthorne
Born Josef Dzhugashvili in Gori, Georgia in 1879, the young Stalin studied to become a priest whilst secretly reading the works of Karl Marx. Politics was to become his religion and between 1902 and 1913 he was arrested for revolutionary activities and exiled to Siberia eight times, escaping on seven occasions. Following the Revolution he employed a cocktail of charm and ruthless cunning to slither up the treacherous Communist Party hierarchy, often by taking posts that nobody wanted which enabled him to build up a power base virtually unnoticed, until, with perfect timing, he was in a position to take over the Party leadership from Lenin when he died in 1924. Surrounding himself with terrified yes-men and trusting absolutely nobody, he was dictator of the Soviet Union from the late 1920s until his death in 1953. In that time he defeated Hitler, out-maneuvered all his rivals and forged a mighty and vast empire of over 800 million people from a patchwork of poor countries which included Russia itself, working on his simple premise of "Death is the solution to all problems. No man - no problem." The human cost was enormous, but this never troubled his conscience. Peasants who resisted his policy of collectivisation were denounced as kulaks and either arrested and shot, exiled or worked to death in the Gulag, his ever-expanding network of concentration camps. Nobody, not even his friends, family or allies were safe. Yet despite all this, he was worshipped by millions as a great leader, although he had more blood on his hands than Hitler, Mao Zedong and Pol Pot put together.
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