Rewriting History in Manga: Stories for the Nation

Springer
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This book analyzes the role of manga in contemporary Japanese political expression and debate, and explores its role in propagating new perceptions regarding Japanese history.
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About the author

Nissim Otmazgin is Senior Lecturer and Chair of the Department of Asian Studies at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. He is the author ofRegionalizing Culture: the Political Economy of Japanese Popular Culture in Asia (2014).

Rebecca Suter is Senior Lecturer in Japanese Studies and Chair of Comparative and International Literary Studies at the University of Sydney, Australia. She is the author of The Japanization of Modernity: Murakami Haruki between Japan and the United States (2008) and Holy Ghosts: The Christian Century in Modern Japanese Fiction (2015).





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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Jun 15, 2016
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Pages
191
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ISBN
9781137551436
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
Political Science / World / Asian
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Children's Studies
Social Science / General
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Nissim Otmazgin
This volume examines the relations between popular culture production and export and the state in East and Southeast Asia including the urban centres and middle-classes of Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, China, Thailand, and the Philippines. It addresses the shift in official thinking toward the role of popular culture in the political life of states brought about by the massive circulation of cultural commodities and the possibilities for attaining "soft power". In contrast to earlier studies, this volume pays particular attention to the role of states and cross-state cultural interactions in these processes. It is the first major attempt to look at these issues comparatively and to provide an important corrective to the limitations of existing scholarship on popular culture in Asia that have usually neglected its political aspects. As part of this move, the essays in this volume suggest a widening of disciplinary perspectives. Hitherto, the preponderance of relevant studies has been in cultural and media fields, anthropology or history. Here the contributors explicitly draw on other disciplinary perspectives – political science and international relations, political economy, law, and policy studies – to explore the complex interrelationships between the state, politics and economics, and popular culture.

This book will be of interest to students and scholars of Asian culture, society and politics, the sociology of culture, political science and media studies.

Cathy Glass
Nissim Otmazgin
This volume examines the relations between popular culture production and export and the state in East and Southeast Asia including the urban centres and middle-classes of Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, China, Thailand, and the Philippines. It addresses the shift in official thinking toward the role of popular culture in the political life of states brought about by the massive circulation of cultural commodities and the possibilities for attaining "soft power". In contrast to earlier studies, this volume pays particular attention to the role of states and cross-state cultural interactions in these processes. It is the first major attempt to look at these issues comparatively and to provide an important corrective to the limitations of existing scholarship on popular culture in Asia that have usually neglected its political aspects. As part of this move, the essays in this volume suggest a widening of disciplinary perspectives. Hitherto, the preponderance of relevant studies has been in cultural and media fields, anthropology or history. Here the contributors explicitly draw on other disciplinary perspectives – political science and international relations, political economy, law, and policy studies – to explore the complex interrelationships between the state, politics and economics, and popular culture.

This book will be of interest to students and scholars of Asian culture, society and politics, the sociology of culture, political science and media studies.

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