Silver Pages on the Lawn: A Student Love Story of the Depression Years of the 1930s

Book Hub Inc
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Silver Pages on the Lawn is the true story of student lovers
and their star-crossed romance that endures parental disapproval as
well as the want of time, money, and privacy. To bridge long
separations, they make love by words alone. Their passionate, eloquent
letters, poignant and poetic, are the heart of this memoir and bring to
life the troubled era in which their story takes place—the lean days of
the Great Depression, war clouds over Europe, and the literary
renaissance of which these aspiring writers were part, form the heart of
their history.


Silver Pages on the Lawn paints a dramatic picture of the
difficult years they lived through and of the steadfast love that
survived it all and carried them through to the life they dreamed of.

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About the author

Nora Lourie Percival was born just after World War I in Samara on the Volga River in Russia. The revolution drove her father out of the country to safety, and her family lived through a civil war and a famine. These tribulations were recorded in Weather of the Heart, her first memoir. In 1922, the family was reunited in New York, where Nora grew up. The author’s career has been largely in the editorial field. She has worked for Random House, the American Management Association, and Barnard College. Now long retired, she is still writing and working as a freelance editor. An only child, she has raised five children and now has eleven grandchildren. She lives in the mountains of North Carolina, where she enjoys the natural beauty and is inspired by the literary renaissance in the South.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Book Hub Inc
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Published on
Nov 13, 2013
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Pages
403
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ISBN
9781595130105
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Biography & Autobiography / Women
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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