PISA Public and Private Schools How Management and Funding Relate to their Socio-economic Profile: How Management and Funding Relate to their Socio-economic Profile

OECD Publishing
4

In most PISA-participating countries and economies, the average socio-economic background of students who attend privately managed schools is more advantaged than that of those who attend public schools. Yet in some countries, there is little difference in the socio-economic profiles between public and private schools. Why? An analysis of PISA results finds that while the prevalence of privately managed schools in a country is not related to socio-economic stratification within a school system, the level of public funding to privately managed schools is: the higher the proportion of public funding allocated to privately managed schools, the smaller the socio-economic divide between publicly and privately managed schools. This report also shows that those countries with narrow socio-economic stratification in their education systems not only maximise equity and social cohesion, but also perform well in the PISA survey.
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Additional Information

Publisher
OECD Publishing
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Published on
Apr 20, 2012
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Pages
106
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ISBN
9789264175006
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Best For
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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OECD
Mobilising private investment is recognised as a priority area for development so that poor countries are not left further behind. But reaping the maximum benefits of investment is not automatic. Policies matter too. A key challenge, therefore, is how to frame investment policies in a way that supports and reinforces economic development. In this respect, OECD Investment Committee co-operation activities with non-member economies aim to promote private investment, both foreign and domestic, and to create the policy environments needed to unleash the full benefits from investment, in terms of economic growth, poverty reduction and sustainable development.

Investment for Development provides a record of the OECD Investment Committee's co-operation programmes with non-member economies and their results. These extensive co-operation activities are organised around three dimensions: global events, regional initiatives and dialogue with individual countries. This report documents how these initiatives help to strengthen implementation capacities and best practices among non-members, drawing on the broad applicability of the principles and expertise the OECD has developed in the area of international investment, including the positive contribution of responsible international business.

Host countries are not alone in advancing this agenda.  Home countries have a key role to play too. One example is the role of official development assistance in mobilising private investment.  Investment for Development includes a report that identifies policy lessons and the analytical evidence that underpins them.

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