Beginnings, Middles, & Ends: Sideways Stories on the Art & Soul of Social Work

White Hat Communications
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Free sample

A sideways story is some moment in life when you thought you were doing
one thing, but you ended up learning another. A sideways story can also
be a poem, or prose, that, because of the way it is written, may not be
all that direct in its meaning. What’s nice about both clouds, and art,
is that you can look at them and just resonate. That can be good for
both the heart and the mind.


Many of the moments of this book
have grown from experiences the author has had or stories he used in
his lectures with students or told in his office with clients. Some of
them have grown from essays written for others, for personal or
professional reasons. They are moments on a path through the discovery
of social work, a journey of beginnings, middles, and ends.


With
just the right blend of humor and candor, each of these stories
contains nuggets of wisdom that you will not find in a traditional
textbook. They capture the essence and the art and soul of social work.
In a world rushed with the illusion of technique and rank empiricism, it
is the author’s hope that some of the things here might make some
moment in your thinking or feeling grow as a social worker. If they
provoke a smile, or a tear, or a critical question, it’s worth it.
Everyone makes a different journey in a life of social work. These
stories are one social worker’s travelogue along the way.

 

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About the author

Ogden W. Rogers, Ph.D., LCSW, ACSW, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Social Work at The University of Wisconsin-River Falls. He has been a clinician, consultant, educator, and storyteller. Dr. Rogers began his social work career in community and adult psychiatry in both inpatient and outpatient settings. He s worked in emergency and critical-care medicine, disaster mental health, and mental health program delivery and evaluation in both public and private auspices. In more recent years, he s been actively involved with the American Red Cross International Services Division concerning human rights in armed conflict. When asked about how he got involved with making a career in social work, he smiled and said, "That reminds me of a story...." 

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Additional Information

Publisher
White Hat Communications
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Published on
Oct 15, 2013
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Pages
252
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ISBN
9781929109357
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Collections / Essays
Social Science / Essays
Social Science / Social Work
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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