The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales

Odyssey Editions
3,461
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THE MAN WHO MISTOOK HIS WIFE FOR A HAT brings together twenty-four of Oliver Sacks’ most fascinating and beloved case studies. The patients in these pages are confronted with almost inconceivably strange neurological disorders; in Sacks’ telling, their stories are a profound testament to the adaptability of the human brain and the resilience of the human spirit. Dr. Sacks treats each of his subjects—the amnesic fifty-year-old man who believes himself to be a young sailor in the Navy, the “disembodied” woman whose limbs have become alien to her, and of course the famous man who mistook his wife for a hat—with a deep respect for the unique individual living beneath the disorder. These tales inspire awe and empathy, allowing the reader to enter the uncanny worlds of those with autism, Alzheimer's, Tourette's syndrome, and other unfathomable neurological conditions. “One of the great clinical writers of the 20th century” (The New York Times), Dr. Sacks brings to vivid life some of the most fundamental questions about identity and the human mind.
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Publisher
Odyssey Editions
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Published on
Jul 21, 2010
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781623730000
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Neuroscience
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This content is DRM protected.
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Although there appears to be a general understanding that the human brain functions similarly in women and in men, an increasing body of knowledge indicates that neuronal connectivity, recruitment, and disease patterns exhibit gender differences. There are clear gender differences in genetic expression, physiologic function, metabolism, hormonal makeup, and psychosocial profile, which often modify the clinical expression of neurologic and other diseases. In addition, ethnic, cultural, and economic factors are frequently overlooked in dealing with health problems of women, even though they undoubtedly have a strong influence on the clinical course of the illness.

The second edition of Neurologic Disease in Women, the only text to specifically cover this important topic, will help physicians and other medical personnel seeking information relevant to clinical care. Sections address general anatomic, hormonal, epidemiologic, and drug aspects of women's health; neurologic conditions that arise during childhood, pregnancy, adulthood, and old age in females; and particular neurologic conditions that present differently or predominantly in females.

There have been important advances in several areas prompting new chapters, new approaches and additional information provided in chapters on hormonal effects in women and the use of HRT; the adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs on hormonal homeostasis, weight and bone health; and cardiovascular diseases in women. New chapters include ones on reproductive and metabolic disorders with AED use, and on movement disorders.

Behavioral neurology is founded on lesions of cortical gray matter, but recently the contributions of cerebral white matter to cognitive and emotional dysfunction have also attracted attention. The Behavioral Neurology of White Matter surveys this broad and fascinating field from a clinical perspective. Stimulated by recent improvements in neuroimaging, white matter has been carefully studied, and its role in the operations of cognition and emotion clarified by correlations with clinical observations. The relevance of normal and abnormal white matter to behavioral neurology is apparent in every context where this question has been examined: in development, aging, and in a host of diseases, intoxications, and injuries. Since the first edition of this book in 2001, steady advances have been made in understanding the neurobiology of white matter and its clinical significance; this edition provides a comprehensive update on this rapidly expanding field. Every chapter has been extensively rewritten, including a comprehensive revision of the account of the neuropsychiatry of white matter, a particularly challenging area. The syndrome of white matter dementia is discussed in detail, and its refinement with new information is considered along with the proposal of mild cognitive dysfunction as a precursor syndrome in many clinical settings. In addition, two new chapters have been added, one on the emerging area of white matter changes associated with neurodegenerative disorders such Alzheimer's Disease, and another on neurologic aspects of white matter including intriguing new information on white matter plasticity. A unifying theme is the concept of connectivity, as it is clear the white matter forms an essential component of the widespread distributed neural networks by which cognition and emotion are organized. In addition to the microconnectivity within gray matter that subserves information processing, the macroconnectivity of white matter enables information transfer - both are critical for the functions of the human mind.
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

 The New York Times–bestselling author of The Brain That Changes Itself presents astounding advances in the treatment of brain injury and illness. Now in an updated and expanded paperback edition.

Winner of the 2015 Gold Nautilus Award in Science & Cosmology 

In his groundbreaking work The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge introduced readers to neuroplasticity—the brain’s ability to change its own structure and function in response to activity and mental experience. Now his revolutionary new book shows how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. The Brain’s Way of Healing describes natural, noninvasive avenues into the brain provided by the energy around us—in light, sound, vibration, and movement—that can awaken the brain’s own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated chronic pain; recovered from debilitating strokes, brain injuries, and learning disorders; overcame attention deficit and learning disorders; and found relief from symptoms of autism, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and cerebral palsy. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia, with simple approaches anyone can use.
 
For centuries it was believed that the brain’s complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brain’s Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing. As he did so lucidly in The Brain That Changes Itself, Doidge uses stories to present cutting-edge science with practical real-world applications, and principles that everyone can apply to improve their brain’s performance and health.
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